Latvian National Theatre

Riga, Latvia

The Latvian National Theatre (Latvijas Nacionalais teatris) was built between 1899-1902 by the design of architect Augusts Reinbergs, becoming Riga's second (Russian) theatre. It closed during the First World War; on the 18th of November 1918, Latvia's independence was declared in the theatre building. In 1917 the first shows in Latvian were held in the theatre.

The Latvian National Theatre was founded 30 November, 1919, just over a year after independence. The creative program was authored by Janis Akuraters, a Latvian writer, then head of the Art department of the Ministry of Education. The current managing director of the theatre is Viesturs Rieksts and the artistic director is Edmunds Freibergs.

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Details

Founded: 1899-1902
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Romário Basílio (2 years ago)
Although the building is fantastic, the staff is the worst possible in all Latvia. They were arrogant and rude to give and information. If they don't like tourists update everyone and put and BIG SIGNAL in front of the heater: WE HATE TOURIST or DO NOT ENTER!!! It would be easier.
Matiss Kevers (2 years ago)
Nice and comfortable place to be! Gives old time vibes!
Mārtiņš Patjanko (2 years ago)
AMAZING must visit tho i dont guarante that its good
Alan Glavin (2 years ago)
Very nice venue, price for admission is very reasonable. Staff are quite helpful even to a non latvian/Russian speaker. Highly recommend to visit
George On tour (2 years ago)
Latvian National Theatre was founded on November 30, 1919. The Great Hall can seat 850 people, the Actor's Hall - 100 people. The theatre's troupe includes 44 actors, 21 freelance actors and 14 directors. The Latvian National Theatre provides shows for all spectators in accordance with its main task - a wide range of repertory and prices. The theatre regularly provides discounts on ticket prices for various social groups, as well as other special offers.
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