Seaplane Harbour Museum

Tallinn, Estonia

The Seaplane Harbour is the newest and one of the most exciting museums in Tallinn. It tells stories about the Estonian maritime and military history. The museum’s display, that comprises of more than a couple of hundred large exhibits, revitalizes the colourful history of Estonia.

British built submarine Lembit weighing 600 tones is the centrepiece of the new museum. Built in 1936 for the Estonian navy, Lembit served in the World War II under the Soviet flag. It remained in service for 75 years being the oldest submarine in the World still in use until it was hauled ashore in 2011. Despite its long history, Lembit is still in an excellent condition offering a glimpse of the 1930s art of technology.

Another exciting attraction is a full-scale replica of Short Type 184, a British pre-World War II seaplane, which was also used by the Estonian armed forces. Short Type 184 has earned its place in military history by being the first aircraft ever to attack an enemy’s ship with an air-launched torpedo. Since none of the original seaplanes have survived, the replica in Seaplane Harbour is the only full-size representation of the aircraft in the whole World.

Simulators mimicking a flight above Tallinn, around-the-world journey in the yellow submarine, navigating on the Tallinn bay make this museum heaven for kids or adventurous adults.

Seaplane Harbour operates in architecturally unique hangars built almost a century ago, in 1916 and 1917, as a part of Peter the Great sea fortress. These hangars are the World’s first reinforced concrete shell structures of such a great size. Charles Lindbergh, the man who performed the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, landed here in 1930s.

On the outdoor area visitors can tour a collection of historic ships, including the Suur Tõll, Europe's largest steam-powered icebreaker.

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Address

Küti 17, Tallinn, Estonia
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Category: Museums in Estonia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Petros PAPAZOGLOU PAPAZOGLAKIS (2 months ago)
This is a real gem! Weather you have a family with kids or you want to feel like a kid again, If you are visiting Tallinn and you have few hours available go for it! You will see sea vessels from small boats until huge submarine and boats that you can explore, you can drive airplanes and boats and you can learn various things! 30 euro for a family is a logical price for what you will receive. There is a combined ticket for more museums if interested ask for it! Highly recommended activity!
Ilona Droniuk (3 months ago)
Super cool museum experience. You can get into couple of ships, including a submarine, play different educational games, learn Estonian maritime history and have lots of fun.
Sylvain OULALA (4 months ago)
Great museum. They did a visible effort to make the make the exhibition interactive. We spend over hour and half there and mesmerized our attention. They could have a bit longer working hours but expect this it was perfect.
Filippo M (5 months ago)
The Estonian Maritime Museum is the institution for collecting, preserving, studying and presenting Estonian maritime culture (maritime history). The mission is to promote knowledge about, respect for and love of the sea. The Museum was founded in Tallinn on the initiative of former captains and sailors in 1935. During its long history, the museum has moved on a number of occasions and since 1981, its main exhibition is located in the 500-year-old Fat Margaret tower in Tallinn Old Town. In May 2012, the Maritime Museum opened another exhibition place at the Seaplane Harbour. Today, the Maritime Museum is one of the largest museums in Estonia, and the most popular one — particularly thanks to the Seaplane Harbour exhibition.
Abelin Astoria (14 months ago)
?✔...Wow!
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