Seaplane Harbour Museum

Tallinn, Estonia

The Seaplane Harbour is the newest and one of the most exciting museums in Tallinn. It tells stories about the Estonian maritime and military history. The museum’s display, that comprises of more than a couple of hundred large exhibits, revitalizes the colourful history of Estonia.

British built submarine Lembit weighing 600 tones is the centrepiece of the new museum. Built in 1936 for the Estonian navy, Lembit served in the World War II under the Soviet flag. It remained in service for 75 years being the oldest submarine in the World still in use until it was hauled ashore in 2011. Despite its long history, Lembit is still in an excellent condition offering a glimpse of the 1930s art of technology.

Another exciting attraction is a full-scale replica of Short Type 184, a British pre-World War II seaplane, which was also used by the Estonian armed forces. Short Type 184 has earned its place in military history by being the first aircraft ever to attack an enemy’s ship with an air-launched torpedo. Since none of the original seaplanes have survived, the replica in Seaplane Harbour is the only full-size representation of the aircraft in the whole World.

Simulators mimicking a flight above Tallinn, around-the-world journey in the yellow submarine, navigating on the Tallinn bay make this museum heaven for kids or adventurous adults.

Seaplane Harbour operates in architecturally unique hangars built almost a century ago, in 1916 and 1917, as a part of Peter the Great sea fortress. These hangars are the World’s first reinforced concrete shell structures of such a great size. Charles Lindbergh, the man who performed the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, landed here in 1930s.

On the outdoor area visitors can tour a collection of historic ships, including the Suur Tõll, Europe's largest steam-powered icebreaker.

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Address

Küti 17, Tallinn, Estonia
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Category: Museums in Estonia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike Hoolehan (37 days ago)
The cafe is a pretty cool place to have a coffee or work with a laptop. The room is dark and there is a constant muffled hum from the museum floor, but the table lamps cut the darkness and it feels like you've found a private cosy corner in a busy station. Also, outlets under every table.
Andrew Martin (41 days ago)
A fantastic museum in an incredible building. In fact, the building is fascinating enough on its own for me! Plan to spend at least two hours, and probably 4 or 5 if you want to go through absolutely everything, including checking out the ships outside. A little on the pricey side for Estonia at €15, plus another €2 for the audioguide. One star knocked off for that! Otherwise, it's a great place.
Alison Heyes (2 months ago)
Really interesting place. The headphone tour is definitely worth the €2 extra cost. Nice cafe too. Interesting submarine visit and i learnt about ice yachting
Smithsholidayroad Inclusive Adventures (2 months ago)
Fantastic place to visit with kids in Tallinn. My kids learnt and loved it so much! Ideally spend three hours exploring here and a great Winter activity.
Bill Barekas (2 months ago)
This is an of the best museums in Talking, quite impressive both the setup and the content are unique. This is must to visit with children since there are a lot of activities for then in the context of the museum. The blue lighting of the main area, although it makes photographing the items difficult, it makes the submarine to look like it's over the sea. Highly recommend for any visitor.
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