Seaplane Harbour Museum

Tallinn, Estonia

The Seaplane Harbour is the newest and one of the most exciting museums in Tallinn. It tells stories about the Estonian maritime and military history. The museum’s display, that comprises of more than a couple of hundred large exhibits, revitalizes the colourful history of Estonia.

British built submarine Lembit weighing 600 tones is the centrepiece of the new museum. Built in 1936 for the Estonian navy, Lembit served in the World War II under the Soviet flag. It remained in service for 75 years being the oldest submarine in the World still in use until it was hauled ashore in 2011. Despite its long history, Lembit is still in an excellent condition offering a glimpse of the 1930s art of technology.

Another exciting attraction is a full-scale replica of Short Type 184, a British pre-World War II seaplane, which was also used by the Estonian armed forces. Short Type 184 has earned its place in military history by being the first aircraft ever to attack an enemy’s ship with an air-launched torpedo. Since none of the original seaplanes have survived, the replica in Seaplane Harbour is the only full-size representation of the aircraft in the whole World.

Simulators mimicking a flight above Tallinn, around-the-world journey in the yellow submarine, navigating on the Tallinn bay make this museum heaven for kids or adventurous adults.

Seaplane Harbour operates in architecturally unique hangars built almost a century ago, in 1916 and 1917, as a part of Peter the Great sea fortress. These hangars are the World’s first reinforced concrete shell structures of such a great size. Charles Lindbergh, the man who performed the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, landed here in 1930s.

On the outdoor area visitors can tour a collection of historic ships, including the Suur Tõll, Europe's largest steam-powered icebreaker.

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Address

Küti 17, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 2012
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: New Independency (Estonia)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tracy Simpson (12 months ago)
This huge hangar of a museum is amazing inside. Lots of planes, boats etc to look at and a submarine to walk through. It also has a nice cafe, parking and a place to hang your coats. Outside there are ships to walk on/through but we didn't have time. Recommended.
Pauline Depière (13 months ago)
Massive and very interactive maritime museum. A lot focusses on military history but not just. The story telling is really good, also for the English explanation. You get to enter a submarine, shoot planes with anti aircraft weapons and discover boats with skates. There's a whole part outside where you can visit some of the boats in the harbor. Take a good 2 hours to spend here!
Sailing Swede (13 months ago)
One of the best and most interesting museums I've been to. Since they have so many things that you can actually tocuh and try out even the kids loved it. The building itself is as well an amazing architectural marvel.
Meelis Loik (15 months ago)
Good place to get overview of the Estonian maritime history. There is even full sized submarine inside the museum halls. Outside is possibility to visit old icebreaker which is now turned into the museum too. Museum restaurant is really good. Food is perfect and you are sitting and enjoying it literally inside maritime history.
Petros PAPAZOGLOU PAPAZOGLAKIS (15 months ago)
This is a real gem! Weather you have a family with kids or you want to feel like a kid again, If you are visiting Tallinn and you have few hours available go for it! You will see sea vessels from small boats until huge submarine and boats that you can explore, you can drive airplanes and boats and you can learn various things! 30 euro for a family is a logical price for what you will receive. There is a combined ticket for more museums if interested ask for it! Highly recommended activity!
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