Alexander Church & The Church Park

Tampere, Finland

The neogothic Alexander Church was built in 1880-1881. The church was named after the Russian tzar Alexander II. It was damaged badly by fire in 1937, but renovated next year.

Nearby the church is Pyynikki Church Park, which functioned as a cemetery from the year 1785 to the late 1880's. Although the cemetery site has been a park over over hundred years, there are still many old tombstones existing. According the legend after Finnish Civil War (1918) many people were buried to the mass grave near the church.

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Address

Pirkankatu 8, Tampere, Finland
See all sites in Tampere

Details

Founded: 1880-1881
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.tampere.fi

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antero Kangas (2 years ago)
Tyylikäs kirkko. Tampereen toiseksi vanhin kirkko. Se piti alunperin rakentaa Keskustorin kulmalle ja sen jälkeen sitä suunniteltiin nykyisen Mika Visan paikalle. Tämän kirkon rakentaminen oli edellytys, että Tampere sai erota Messukylän seurakunnasta ja että Tampereen seurakunta saatiin perustaa. Rakennusaikana kirkko kuitenkin paloi melkein kokonaan, mutta rakennettiin uudestaan ja uusi seurakunta perustettiin.
Tuomas Eerola (3 years ago)
A pretty regular church. Tuomasmessu is nice.
Nils Haccius (4 years ago)
Nothing special. No colored windows and very plain facility
Zak Henderson (4 years ago)
Beautiful Church
Esa Toivola (4 years ago)
Church nr. 2 in Tampere. Open church with people coming and going. Side altars for kids.
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