Alexander Church & The Church Park

Tampere, Finland

The neogothic Alexander Church was built in 1880-1881. The church was named after the Russian tzar Alexander II. It was damaged badly by fire in 1937, but renovated next year.

Nearby the church is Pyynikki Church Park, which functioned as a cemetery from the year 1785 to the late 1880's. Although the cemetery site has been a park over over hundred years, there are still many old tombstones existing. According the legend after Finnish Civil War (1918) many people were buried to the mass grave near the church.

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Address

Pirkankatu 8, Tampere, Finland
See all sites in Tampere

Details

Founded: 1880-1881
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.tampere.fi

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Camden Kross (15 days ago)
Very simple and nice. I went in while they were Bible reading (In Finnish) only 3 people there. Cool inside look at the culture here. Otherwise wouldn’t go out of your way to see it.
Arja Harjula (12 months ago)
Church of my childhood
Olli Lönnberg (14 months ago)
A Beautiful church from the end of 19th century.
Nestori Krapi (2 years ago)
First time ever in my life i heard voices in my head. I believe it was god.
Happiness Boniphace (3 years ago)
I like the songs the way we praise God
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