Raadi Cemetery

Tartu, Estonia

The Raadi cemetery is the oldest and largest burial ground in Tartu, dating back to 1773. Many prominent historical figures are buried there. It is also the largest Baltic German cemetery in Estonia after the destruction of Kopli cemetery in Tallinn. Until 1841, it was the only cemetery in the town.

Between 1771 and 1772, Catherine the Great, Russian empress issued an edict which decreed that from that point on no-one who died (regardless of their social standing or class origins) was to be buried in a church crypt or churchyard; all burials were to take place in the new cemeteries to be built throughout the entire Russian empire, which were to be located outside town boundaries.

The burial ground was officially opened on 5 November 1773 as the St. John's (town) parish cemetery. It also served as the University of Tartu burial ground. The St. Mary's (country) parish and Russian Orthodox Dormition congregation cemeteries were established north-west of the St. John's in the same year. It served as the only cemetery in the town until 1841.

Burials at the cemetery were drastically reduced after the transfer of Baltic German population over to western Poland in late 1939. Burials at the cemetery continued on a much smaller scale until 1944, principally among those Baltic Germans who had refused Hitler's call to leave the region.

By the beginning of the 21st century, the expansion of the town has passed beyond the borders of the cemetery and alternative burial grounds are established elsewhere in the town.

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Address

Kalmistu 24, Tartu, Estonia
See all sites in Tartu

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hendrik Matvejev (3 months ago)
Miina haud on parim.
Kaurik ' (4 months ago)
ilus koht
Elizabeth Toney (7 months ago)
Such a unique place! Tombstones that look German, Estonian, art nouveau and Russian and everything inbetween. I could have spent half a day there.
catherina stone (2 years ago)
Tere! Kas teile oleks võimalik ka e-kirja teel kirjutada? Ei leia teie e-aadressi. Riina Kivaste
Kristiina Vahemaa (3 years ago)
So green
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