Three Crosses is a monument designed by Polish–Lithuanian architect and sculptor Antoni Wiwulski in 1916. It was torn down in 1950 by order of the Soviet Union authorities. A new monument designed by Henrikas Šilgalis was erected in its place in 1989.

There has been three wooden crosses on the hill at least since 1636. The origins of the monument are explained in a fictitious legend, written in the Bychowiec Chronicle among others, according to which seven Franciscan monks, who were invited to Vilnius from Podolia by Petras Goštautas, were tortured to death (crucified and thrown into the Vilnia River, according to some sources) on 4 March 1333 by local pagan inhabitants. The chapel was erected on the spot where they died and the crosses were added later on.

A spectacular panorama of the Vilnius Old Town can be observed from top of the hill.

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Founded: 1636
Category: Statues in Lithuania

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matthew Cook (2 months ago)
Three crosses on top of a hill. You can appreciate the crosses better from a distance - the bottom if the hill. They are well illuminated. When standing next to them you have a brilliant view over the city of Vilnius.
Aleksandra Kaczurba (2 months ago)
Good view point of Vilnius. Need to hike a bit (quite difficult during winter) but there are stairs from one side of the mountain and a parking lot from the other. Worth visiting in a good - not cloudy/foggy weather.
Erika Zamiatina (2 months ago)
The view is amazing up there ! I like that you have long and short way for getting the so you can plan by your time. Beautiful nature around , really magical
Voodoo Bangla (4 months ago)
So I found my way up the hill of the three crosses and the view did not disappoint. It was a bit unnerving climbing up the wooden steps because there was no hand rail, so one misstep and you'll come crashing down hundreds of steps. I'm not afraid of heights, but when I know that if I fall - I die, I do get vertigo. Anyway if you go to Vilnius definitely hit up this spot. It has a beautiful view of the old town of Vilnius.
Crista Popescu (5 months ago)
Apparently this is a symbol of the city and really offers great views over Vilnius. It's a nicely, albeit steep walk up quite a few stairs. I think that it would benefit from more signs along the path to guide those who don't know their way
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