Three Crosses is a monument designed by Polish–Lithuanian architect and sculptor Antoni Wiwulski in 1916. It was torn down in 1950 by order of the Soviet Union authorities. A new monument designed by Henrikas Šilgalis was erected in its place in 1989.

There has been three wooden crosses on the hill at least since 1636. The origins of the monument are explained in a fictitious legend, written in the Bychowiec Chronicle among others, according to which seven Franciscan monks, who were invited to Vilnius from Podolia by Petras Goštautas, were tortured to death (crucified and thrown into the Vilnia River, according to some sources) on 4 March 1333 by local pagan inhabitants. The chapel was erected on the spot where they died and the crosses were added later on.

A spectacular panorama of the Vilnius Old Town can be observed from top of the hill.

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Founded: 1636
Category: Statues in Lithuania

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marcos Shiang (7 months ago)
A very nice spot to view the center of Vilnius. You should also enjoy the history of the three crosses.
Zarina Sribna (8 months ago)
This is a very important monument to commemorate the history of Christianity formation in Lithuania. It’s located on a hill and from the spot you can also capture a great view on the city. A very powerful place.
ahmed el shafey (11 months ago)
You really need to have a good cardiovascular ability ...if not then it will be your start training ;). The view is nice from there a panoramic view
Lumpen (15 months ago)
If you came to Vilnius, visit Hill of Three Crosses, just to enjoy such beautiful view
Karl Jones (18 months ago)
Getting to the top requires climbing a lot of stairs but it's well worth the view!
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