Three Crosses is a monument designed by Polish–Lithuanian architect and sculptor Antoni Wiwulski in 1916. It was torn down in 1950 by order of the Soviet Union authorities. A new monument designed by Henrikas Šilgalis was erected in its place in 1989.

There has been three wooden crosses on the hill at least since 1636. The origins of the monument are explained in a fictitious legend, written in the Bychowiec Chronicle among others, according to which seven Franciscan monks, who were invited to Vilnius from Podolia by Petras Goštautas, were tortured to death (crucified and thrown into the Vilnia River, according to some sources) on 4 March 1333 by local pagan inhabitants. The chapel was erected on the spot where they died and the crosses were added later on.

A spectacular panorama of the Vilnius Old Town can be observed from top of the hill.

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Founded: 1636
Category: Statues in Lithuania

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Morris (12 months ago)
A nice quick hike up the hill and you have the best view of Vilnius. Even kids can make it up.
Vilius Kraujutis (viliusk) (13 months ago)
It's a very nice Panorama up there. You can enjoy sunset. Although be prepared to climb a very steep Hill If you are by foot.There is the road to climb most of the HillBy car.
Ses. Aušra Liutkevičiūtė CC (13 months ago)
Nice spot day and night revealing a spectacular panoramic view of the old city of Vilnius for free :)
Inga 5555 (13 months ago)
Beautiful panoramic view. I recommend go there couple times: in day time and in dark evening or sunset,you can see different views and everyone are Beautiful
Liam Smith (15 months ago)
As one of the landmarks of Vilnius it is not only fun to see the Three Crosses on top of the hill from the city, but it is also fun to enjoy the wonderful panoramic from the sight. The stairs leading to it from the other hills are sturdy and secure and the platform itself offers nice-to-know information about the monument as well as the view.
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