Näsilinna Palace

Tampere, Finland

The Neo-Baroque palace Näsilinna was built by Finlayson factory owner Peter von Nottbeck in 1898. It was designed by architect K.A.Wrede. Due to deaths in the owner's family, Näsilinna was soon left without residents, and the city of Tampere bought it in 1905. It was changed to museum already in 1908.

Later Näsilinna was unoccupied for years and dilapidated badly. The restoration was completed in 2015. The first floor was restored to the early 1900s style and there is a restaurant and cafe. The second floor hosts a museum exhibiting the von Nottbeck family story in the early 1900s.

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Cindy de Nottbeck said 4 years ago
I just came back from visiting Nasilinna and all my other family history in Tampere Finland it is all beautiful and well worth the trip still didnt get to see everything so some day I will visit again.

Cindy de Nottbeck said 4 years ago
It is all newly renovate with a Museum and Resturant can`t wait to go summer of 2015 for the opening.It is a big part of my fathers family history.

Cindy de Nottbeck said 5 years ago
Can`t wait to go and visit a place of my history. And seeing all the renovations.


Address

Näsinpuisto, Tampere, Finland
See all sites in Tampere

Details

Founded: 1898
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sami Piskonen (8 months ago)
Hieno ja viihtyisä paikka. Kannattaa käydä katsomassa
Jouko Riihonen (8 months ago)
Special setting.
Päivi Mäkipää (8 months ago)
Ihana joulufiilis, varsinkin jos käy hämärtyvässä illansuussa
M T (16 months ago)
Lovely place
Arttu Viljakainen (3 years ago)
Näsilinna is a beautiful place. There's a park for children right next to it, and inside you'll find Cafe Milavida and a museum.
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