Roskilde Abbey or Our Lady's Abbey was a monastery of nuns dedicated to Saint Mary the Virgin. It was founded in the early 12th century for Benedictine nuns, but in 1177 became part of the Cistercian reform movement.

It was chiefly known for the tomb of Saint Margrethe or Margaret of Ølsemagle or of Højelse (both names of places near Køge), who, although murdered by her husband, had been wrongly buried as a suicide on the beach at Køge. After miracles were declared to have happened round her grave, her remains were moved to the Abbey Church, the Vor Frue church, in 1176 by Absalon of Lund, Bishop of Roskilde, a kinsman of Margrethe; he arranged for the construction of a suitable shrine in the church, and transferred the nunnery to the Cistercians in the following year. Despite Absalon's best efforts, and also despite the local veneration, Margrethe was never formally canonised. The shrine was nevertheless later declared a place of pilgrimage by the Pope, and the nuns were allotted one third of the income generated by it. Despite all efforts, however, the center of the cultus remained the small chapel built near Margrethe's original grave on the beach.

The abbey was suppressed in 1536 during the Protestant Reformation in Denmark. Around 1600 the convent buildings and the eastern half of the church were demolished. Today the former abbey church has a beautiful furniture from the 17th century.

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Fruegade 2, Roskilde, Denmark
See all sites in Roskilde

Details

Founded: 1176
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eva Hejlsø (14 months ago)
Beautiful setting with many details and stories.
Eva Hejlsø (14 months ago)
Beautiful setting with many details and stories.
Michael Houmaark (15 months ago)
Super nice place can only recommend getting a tour
Michael Houmaark (15 months ago)
Super nice place can only recommend getting a tour
Kitta Larsen (15 months ago)
We had an absolutely fantastic trip, especially because of our guide, who was the caretaker of the monastery, BIG thanks to him for the trip. It clearly shows how important a good guide is. The monastery is not big but really beautiful, especially the knight's hall is fantastic, a little hidden gem in Roskilde
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