Tranekær Castle

Tranekær, Denmark

Tranekær Castle was originally erected as a defensive fortress in the 13th century. The oldest part is the north wing, which dates back to about 1200. The 3m thick walls were added in the 14th century. The castle has been remodelled many times and today has two wings and an octagonal stair tower with a tall spire. It has belonged to the Ahlefeldt-Laurvig family for about 350 years. There is no admittance to the castle itself, but the castle park is open to the public.

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Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sofie De Bruyne (2 years ago)
Super
Poul Erik Kristiansen (4 years ago)
Det er en fornøjelse at opleve den gamle hestestald der nu er indrettet til café i de gamle heste bokse I den tilhørende park er der mange gamle trær blandt andet kinesisk vandgrav Og flot natur Kan anbefales at besøge stedet
Kim Jensen (4 years ago)
The Castle was beautiful, but it was private property. Its not a place you'll spend much time.
Kim Jensen (4 years ago)
The Castle was beautiful, but it was private property. Its not a place you'll spend much time.
Rike Wichterich (4 years ago)
Lovely attraction point for everyone who loves art and nature
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