Bikernieki Memorial

Riga, Latvia

Bikernieki Memorial is a war memorial to The Holocaust victims of World War II in Bikernieki forest, near Riga. Bikernieki forest is the biggest mass murder site during The Holocaust in Latvia with two memorial territories spanning over 80,000 square metres with 55 marked burial sites with around 20,000 victims still buried in total.

The memorial was initially planned and construction started in 1986, but was delayed after Latvia declared independence in 1991. The construction was revived in 2000 by German War Graves Commission with the help of local Latvian organisations and several German cities. It was financed mostly by German government and organisations, Austrian State Fund, and involved city donations. It was designed by Sergey Rizh and opened on November 30, 2001.

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Address

Ķeguma iela 57, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 2001
Category: Statues in Latvia
Historical period: New Independency (Latvia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

George Gordeyev (15 months ago)
Place where you feel history. Memorial is a great piece of art
Meir Shvartz (15 months ago)
אתר חשוב לביקור . בורת הרג ממלחמת העולם השניה .
Dāvis Bautris (2 years ago)
Ļoti laba vieta!
Peter Hadfield (2 years ago)
The sky was blue and the silence was broken only by the occasional traffic on the nearby road and the sound of birdsong. Such a beautiful, peaceful spot in the forest. It was hard to reconcile the tranquility of this place with the unimaginable horrors that were perpetrated here.
Viktors Zajacs (2 years ago)
Good place for walking
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