Cruiser Aurora

Saint Petersburg, Russia

Aurora is a protected cruiser, currently preserved as a museum ship in St. Petersburg. One of the first incidents of the October Revolution in Russia took place on the cruiser.

Aurora was one of three Pallada-class cruisers, built in St. Petersburg for service in the Pacific Far East. All three ships of this class served during the Russo-Japanese War. The second ship, Pallada, was sunk by the Japanese at Port Arthur in 1904. The third ship, Diana, was interned in Saigon after the Battle of the Yellow Sea. Aurora was part of the Russian 2nd Pacific Squadron formed mostly from the Russian Baltic Fleet, which was sent from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific, under the command of Vice-Admiral Zinovy Rozhestvensky. On the way to the Far East, she sustained light damage from confused friendly fire in the Dogger Bank incident.

On 27 and 28 May 1905, Aurora took part in the Battle of Tsushima, along with the rest of the Russian squadron. During the battle, the wounded Senior officer of the ship, Captain of 2nd rank Arkadiy Konstantinovich Nebolsine took command of the cruiser. After that Aurora, covering other, much slower Russian vessels, under the command of Rear-Admiral Oskar Enkvist, with two other Russian cruisers broke through to neutral Manila, where she was interned. In 1906, Aurora returned to the Baltic and became a cadet training ship. From 1906 until 1912 the cruiser visited a number of other countries; in November 1911 the ship was in Bangkok as part of the celebrations in honour of the coronation of the new King of Siam.

During the First World War the ship operated in the Baltic Sea. In 1915, her armament was changed to fourteen 152 mm guns. At the end of 1916, the ship was moved to Petrograd (the renamed St Petersburg) for a major repair. The city was brimming with revolutionary ferment and part of her crew joined the 1917 February Revolution. A revolutionary committee was created on the ship, with Aleksandr Belyshev elected as its captain. Most of the crew joined the Bolsheviks, who were preparing for a Communist revolution.

According to the Soviet account of history, on 25 October 1917, Aurora refused to carry out an order to put to sea, which sparked the October Revolution. At 9.45 p.m on that date, a blank shot from her forecastle gun signaled the start of the assault on the Winter Palace, which was to be the last episode of the October Revolution. The cruiser's crew allegedly took part in that attack.

In 1922, Aurora was brought to service again as a training ship. During the Second World War, the guns were taken from the ship and used in the land defence of Leningrad. The ship herself was docked in Oranienbaum port, and was repeatedly shelled and bombed. On 30 September 1941 she was damaged and sunk in the harbour. After extensive repairs in 1945 - 1947, Aurora was permanently anchored on the Neva in Leningrad as a monument to the Great October Socialist Revolution and in 1957 became a museum-ship. From 1956 to the present day 28 million people have visited the cruiser Aurora.

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Details

Founded: 1900-1903
Category: Museums in Russia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Preechavut Khumsab (12 months ago)
If you've known about the history between Russia and Thailand more than 100 years ago, So you'd understand why I've to unavoidably visit this battleship. Because of a good Russian Relationship which made Thailand's survival from slaves in France and the UK. colonization.
Venomous Snake (2 years ago)
Not worth the visit and the expensive ticket. Most of the cruiser is closed and this is not a temporary thing. Better visit HMS Belfast in London.
Paulo Gustavo (3 years ago)
An Amazing piece of history very well preserved! It's such a cool visit! Check the schedules as many times I went there and it was closed. Enjoy it to the MAX!
Aleksandr Fedorov (4 years ago)
Very interesting museum. A lot of historical facts. Good for kids
Aaron Bogott (4 years ago)
The Aurora Cruiser is an enjoyable visit and has so much historical significance. The museum, the ship, is not large so a visit only takes 30-40 minutes, but it costs the same or close to the Hermitage which is no comparison. If coming for a short time to the city and you have limited opportunities, then photograph this impressive ship from the outside and go on to other sites. My family loved it, but we live here.
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