Le Dolmen du Mont Ubé is a Neolithic / Chalcolithic () passage grave which was discovered in 1848 by workmen quarrying for stone. The passge leads into bottle shaped chamber that used to have four internal compartments each blocked with low stone slabs. The capstones were taken as well as all but one of the internal compartments. Within the passage stand three stones that may also have had a low sill at some time. These were later used to block of the passage so it could be used as a pigsty.Finds recovered from the workmens spoil heaps included 10 or 12 pots, a Jersey bowl, vase supports, flint and stone tools, stone axes, polished stone pendants and a grape cup (unique to the Channel Islands). Burnt and unburnt human remains were noted in the cists.

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Details

Founded: 4500 - 3000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

More Information

www.prehistoricjersey.net

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mad Dog Rock (2 years ago)
Nice neolithic site. Shane it is not kept as it should be, or promoted to the wider public.
Piotr Tomaszewski (2 years ago)
Older than Stonehenge and smaller too. But with a strong feelings of history and our ancestors... The problem is - an ugly private house on the back and a wall, which really destroyed the view and the atmosphere.
Antonio Perestrelo (3 years ago)
colm bloomer (4 years ago)
Ben Moody (4 years ago)
Nice spot to walk the dogs
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