St Tugual's Chapel dates back to the 11th century when the island was a haven for an order of Norman monks. However, there is evidence that the site has had religious significance since the 6th century. The chapel was designed in such a way that they could sit in the building's north nave without being seen by the public who would sit in the west portion of the chapel.

In the years before the Wood family took hold of the lease on the island, in 1949, the grounds around the west and south of the chapel had become overgrown and it was in their time that the churchyard come garden was made around the church.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

herm.com
news.bbc.co.uk

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Danny Boi (2 years ago)
I did a church speech here and sang a song lovely for being 1 wid Jesus
Anthony Ashworth (3 years ago)
Lovely peaceful chapel,very picturesque.
Jessica Millman (3 years ago)
Beautiful, quaint and peaceful, with about as much character as is possible. ?
Peter Lane (3 years ago)
Lovely little quiet place. Just about the only attraction in the centre of the Island! Worth a few photos
Peter Forbes (3 years ago)
Small,old,lovely and inspiring
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