Orthodox Church of St. Nicholas

Kotka, Finland

The Orthodox Church of Kotka, known also as St. Nicolas church, was built between 1799-1801 under the Russian order. It was designed in accordance with drawings by Jakov Perrin, architect of the St Petersburg Admiralty. The orthodox church is probably the oldest building in Kotka and one of the rare to survive a British bombardment of the town in 1855.

The church was built in Russian Neo-classicism style. Differing from a typical orthodox church in Finland, there are lot of sculptures inside the St. Nicholas Church.

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Address

Papinkatu 8-10, Kotka, Finland
See all sites in Kotka

Details

Founded: 1799-1801
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

More Information

www.kotka.fi
www.kymi.fi

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lalayan Vladimiros (2 years ago)
Церковь Святого Николая - самое старое здание Котки. В последние годы порядком поизветшала. Наконец-то занялись реставрацией.
Timo Keveri (2 years ago)
Kotkan vanhin kirkko ja tutustumisen arvoinen paikka, jos ei taas joudu ilkivallan ja varkauden kohteeksi.
Ioanna Keicer (2 years ago)
Были зимой, все закрыто и внутрь не попали. Внешне симпатично.
Sanna (3 years ago)
Kaunis kirkko, viihtyisä ympäristö, kesällä erityisesti.
Elizabeth Toney (4 years ago)
Beautiful inside and out. I attended a service there as well, it was my first time seeing a Russian orthodox one. It was very moving and located in a nice park.
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