Church of Panagia tou Moutoulla

Moutoullas, Cyprus

The church of Panagia is inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage List, which includes nine other painted Byzantine churches of the Troodos range. According to the dedicatory inscription on the north wall of the Holy Bema, the church was built and decorated with frescoes in 1280, with the donation of Ioannis of Moutoullas and his wife Irene. Both of them are depicted holding a model of the church. It is therefore possible, that the Church of Panagia tou Moutoulla was a private chapel. The church belongs to the well-known architectural type of the single-aisled, steep-pitched timber roof of the Troodos region. The narthex was added at a later stage, after the beginning of the 16th century, and it extends to the west and north sides the church. The timber roof also covers the narthex.

As far as the mural decoration of the church is concerned, it is worth noting that it is the only series of wall-paintings of the thirteenth century (1280) which survive in Cyprus that can be dated with precision. Due to the small size of the church, the iconographic programme was reduced accordingly. It must be noted that the donors are faithful to the orthodox tradition, without ignoring their contemporary world, a fact that becomes obvious when one notices the repertoire. It is in any case a remarkable set of wall paintings.

Both the style and the iconographic programme of the painter are of great interest. His style is a mixture of older 12th century Byzantine characteristics, with elements from his contemporary western art. He also uses elements from the painting developed in the crusader lands of the East, in Cappadocia, Crete and generally in remote Greek lands. Some of these characteristics can also be seen in Apulian hermitages and the Calabrian churches of South Italy. The exterior of the north wall of the church was decorated at the end of the 15th or the beginning of the 16th century with a scene from the Last Judgement.

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Address

E912, Moutoullas, Cyprus
See all sites in Moutoullas

Details

Founded: 1280
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juan Fernández-Mayoralas (14 days ago)
Fui preocupado, pensando que podía estar cerrada. Pero pude visitarla, y pese a su aspecto sencillo, el interior es bellísimo.
Father Gavriil (2 years ago)
Церковь находится в деревне Мутуллас чуть в стороне от дороги, на небольшом возвышении. Известно, что она была построена в 1280 году Иоаннисом Мутулласом и его супругой Ириной. Имя Богородицы, название деревни и фамилия строителя храма − очевидно, что однокоренные слова. Только нам пока не удалось выяснить какое из них первично. Для простоты будем считать, что фамилия и название деревни произошли от имени Богородицы. :) О том, что храм построен Иоаннисом и Ириной сообщает надпись на северной стене у алтаря, где они также оба изображены. Наличие подобной фрески свидетельствует о том, что церковь не принадлежала какому-либо монастырю, а была семейной церковью богатой семьи.
Max PD (2 years ago)
Da vedere!
Δημήτρης Καλογήρου (2 years ago)
Ωραιος τοπος για να πατε
Loukas Georgiou (3 years ago)
Teleia Thea pros oles tis kateuthinseis Kai poli wraia psuxiki atmosphera
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