Brederode Castle Ruins

Santpoort-Zuid, Netherlands

Brederode castle was founded in the second half of the 13th century by William I van Brederode (1215–1285). William was a descendant of the lords van Teylingen, who were related to the counts of Holland. The castle formed part of the high lordship Brederode, which had been given in loan in the 13th century to the lords of Brederode by the count of Holland. The name Brederode is a reference to a wooded area called Brede Roede (literally: broad wood), that was cleared and on which the castle was built. The castle was at first not more than a tower, but around 1300 Dirk II van Brederode had the tower pulled down and replaced with a proper castle.

During the Hook and Cod wars, the Brederode family stayed loyal to Margaret of Bavaria. In 1351 the castle was besieged by Gijsbrecht van Nijenrode, who supported the opposing Cod faction. After the surrender of the castle, it was so badly damaged that it was demolished. After the reconciliation of the Brederode family and the counts of Holland in 1354, the castle was rebuilt. It was no longer used as living space, but it did remain a base of strategic importance for the Hook faction, led by William van Brederode.

When the Hook faction besieged Haarlem in 1426, the Cod faction destroyed the southern part of the castle. William was forbidden to repair or enforce the castle, leaving it in a damaged state. Eventually in 1464 the north part of the castle was allowed to be restored. During the Rise of the cheese and bread people in 1492, the castle was plundered by German soldiers. Since then it was no longer inhabited. In 1568 it fell to the States of Holland. During the forming of the Batavian Republic, the property was nationalised. Ever since, the ruins have been property of the State.

After the defeat of the Geuzen at the Battle of Haarlemmermeer, Haarlem had to surrender to the Spanish soldiers in 1573 after the Siege of Haarlem. As a result the Protestant Lancelot van Brederode was beheaded and the castle was plundered and set on fire. Following this the castle was threatened by encroaching dunes. In 1579 Holland loaned the lordship to a side branch of the van Brederode family. In 1679, Wolfert van Brederode, last lord of Brederode, died, and the ruins became property of the States of Holland and the Dutch Republic. In the 19th century the ruins were one of the first buildings to be restored by the government, and they became the first national monument of the Netherlands.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Netherlands

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Katia Kerekesova (2 years ago)
We stumbled upon this place by pure accident during a Saturday bike ride and couldn't be more pleasantly surprised that this gem existed in our back yard! Extra points for the staff dressed in period clothing. 🏰🇳🇱
Tasha Brown (2 years ago)
This was a wonderful day trip location. We were lucky to have clear skys, so the views from the towers were beautiful. The grounds are lovingly maintained, the staff were knowledgeable and eager to answer questions and the historical artifacts were documented in English and Dutch. The castle was easy to find, has free parking and was definitely worth the price.
Krishna Singh (2 years ago)
The pace was OK, you can visit the place if you are integrated in history. I reached the pace by coincidence. On busy days reservation is a must.
Roborooskie (2 years ago)
Amazing castle ruins, been comming here for years!
Javier Lizarzaburu (2 years ago)
Just enough experts' intervention to make it worth the experience. A good and playful sense of the past amidst glorious gardens and massive trees.
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