Rheinisches Landesmuseum

Trier, Germany

The Rheinische Landesmuseum Trier is one of the most important archaeological museums in Trier. Its collection stretches from prehistory through the Roman period, the Middle Ages to the Baroque. But especially the Roman past of Germany's oldest living city (Augusta Treverorum) is represented in the State Museum Trier based on archaeological finds. The museum was founded in 1877.

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Address

Weimarer Allee 1, Trier, Germany
See all sites in Trier

Details

Founded: 1877
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Margaret Hanhardt (4 months ago)
Very interesting. From the Iron age to the 17th Century. Everything well preserved. Take a mobile along for explanations of major pieces. We'll worth a visit
Jef Adriaenssens (4 months ago)
Terrific museum of the history of the Trier region. We learned a lot ?
Paul Sanders (4 months ago)
Superb collection, but the presentation is crying out for a revamp, as so often in german museums. Therefore only three stars.
Steven Vispoel (5 months ago)
Nice museum, not too big but interesting if you like roman history.
Jonno Whitby (7 months ago)
Excellent. Give yourself plenty of time. English speakers should get an audio guide as most signage is in German.
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