Trier Amphitheater

Trier, Germany

The Roman Amphitheater in Trier is designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site. The arena, built in the 2nd century A.D. for cruel games with gladiators and animals, had a seating capacity of about 20,000. When you enter the premises you walk through the ruins of the entrance gate. This was used as a quarry in the Middle Ages. The arena itself is surrounded by a protecting wall with openings for animal cages. Underneath the arena is a vast cellar where, in Roman times, prisoners sentenced to death were kept alongside exotic wild animals like African lions or Asian tigers.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Bergstraße 35, Trier, Germany
See all sites in Trier

Details

Founded: 100-200 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Soren Riis (19 months ago)
Super Roman theatre. Fantastic underground escavated ruins. Worth seeing.
Mirzo B (19 months ago)
I visited this place in 2010, it's amazing! I am proud of it! We listened to symphony #9 Bah, very gorgeous!
Tristan Amer (2 years ago)
The idea that this is still standing from around 700 AD is incredible!
Paul Robertson (2 years ago)
Old Roman amphitheatre close to the center of the city. Once you get a ticket, you can wander around the place and read about the history while enjoying the building skills of the Romans, or what's left of it after medieval times reused some of the stonework for other projects. Worth a look
Robert Meechan (2 years ago)
Well maintained and presented historical site. I come from an area of the UK named ‘roman country’ and enjoyed the amphitheater very much. Doesn’t cost much to enter either!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.