Museum Het Prinsenhof

Delft, Netherlands

Museum Het Prinsenhof, 'the Princes' Court', is located in the former Sint Agathaklooster monastery. In 1572, William of Orange chose the monastery as one of his houses. From this building, the Prince led the uprising against the Spanish rule over the Netherlands. On the 10th of July 1584 he was murdered on the stairs of Het Prinsenhof by the Spanish sympathiser Balthazar Gerards. The wall of the stairs shows two bullet holes that bear witness to this event.

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Details

Founded: 1403
Category: Museums in Netherlands

More Information

www.delft.nl
www.holland.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jade E (2 years ago)
Beautiful museum with many interesting aspects. Loved the artwork!
Wolf Linden (2 years ago)
The history of the royal family of the house Oranje-Nassau is presented with many most interesting details.
Witold Kepinski (2 years ago)
Founding father Willem Orange lived here. Good place to explore the birth of Dutch Republic. Also overview of Delfts Blue artwork
Frans Van Nieuwpoort (3 years ago)
It's a nice museum showing Dutch national history.
Eduard Hernàndez (3 years ago)
The museum is interesting, mixes art and history (this is the place where Willem van Orange was killed). There is enough level of detail to learn the basics behind each piece. In some points the museum uses advanced techniques (holograms, interactive games) to engage further the visitor. Worth a visit. Museumkaart is accepted.
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