The DDR Museum is an interactive museum located in the former governmental district of East Germany, right on the river Spree. Its exhibition shows the daily life in East Germany (known in German as the Deutsche Demokratische Republik or DDR) in a direct 'hands-on' way. For example, a covert listening device gives visitors the sense of being 'under surveillance'.

The museum was opened on July 15, 2006, as a private museum. The private funding is unusual in Germany, because German museums are normally funded by the state. The museum met some opposition from state-owned museums, who considered possibly 'suspect' a private museum and concerned that the museum could be used as an argument to question public funding to museums in general.

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Founded: 2006
Category: Museums in Germany

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Tomáš Titěra (2 years ago)
The most interactive museum I've ever been to. You have to open a lot of drawers to see all the exhibits. Totally worth the visit. Might be a bit tedious for someone who grew up in the eastern block, but it's still a nice comprehandable collection of objects and information from everyday life. Would appreciate more focus on the Berlin Wall in this context, but I suppose there are other dedicated museums in the city focusing on that.
Adam Warren (2 years ago)
After a few days of relatively ordinary museums (which there's nothing wrong with, and of which excellent examples Berlin is full!) this was a nice light-hearted break. It may be slightly geared towards children, but I still learned plenty here about a period of history I was pretty ignorant about, and had fun while I was doing it. Recommended!
Michaela Trykarová (2 years ago)
Very nicely done museum where you can learn about the German Democratic Era. Exposition is quite big and offers lot of interactive features and perks. Plethora of information is well explained at there is games and riddles incorporated in the visit as well to make it even more enjoyable. Would like to drive the famous Trabant or decode the language slang of the past eastern block of Germany? Well head over and don't forget to buy your tickets online, it will save you a lot of valuable time and waiting outside in the middle of winter!
Μηνάς Χρυσανθακόπουλος (3 years ago)
Absolutely have-to-visit museum of the history, way of life, and many other things concerning the old East Germany. Huge material of info, images, photos and sound given in clever and interactive ways through screens and other high technology ways. I believe Germans will love it more because they know more about the history of Germany those years after the war but visitors from other countries will enjoy it as well. You actually feel like you're an Eastern German citizen! I totally recommend it!
Angus Broadbent (3 years ago)
Very interactive and enjoyable experience. The queue was long to get in but it moved at a decent pace. They controlled the amount of people coming in so it wasn't too overcrowded which was good. Exhibits were both fun and informative. A strong recommendation from me!
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