Holocaust Memorial

Berlin, Germany

The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, also known as the Holocaust Memorial is dedicated to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, designed by architect Peter Eisenman and engineer Buro Happold. It consists of a 19,000 m2 site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. They are organized in rows, 54 of them going north-south, and 87 heading east-west at right angles but set slightly askew. An attached underground 'Place of Information' holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims, obtained from the Israeli museum Yad Vashem.

Building began on April 1, 2003 and was finished on December 15, 2004. It was inaugurated on May 10, 2005, sixty years after the end of World War II, and opened to the public two days later.

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Founded: 2003
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Germany

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stephen Kitchener (Steve) (4 years ago)
It stands for a time we must not forget.
Juan Arias (4 years ago)
A good reminder that the past can be repeated
Nima Maloumi (4 years ago)
Very impressive spot, there is a sad story behind which made me down today.
Charlie Arnot (4 years ago)
A sobering, compulsory experience.
Gimme The Mic (4 years ago)
Beautiful place with a very sad story behind it you really should visit it when you are there
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