The Berlin Wall was a barrier that divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989, constructed by the German Democratic Republic (GDR, East Germany) starting on 13 August 1961, that completely cut off (by land) West Berlin from surrounding East Germany and from East Berlin until it was opened in November 1989. Its demolition officially began on 13 June 1990 and was completed in 1992. The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, which circumscribed a wide area (later known as the 'death strip') that contained anti-vehicle trenches, 'fakir beds' and other defenses. The Eastern Bloc claimed that the wall was erected to protect its population from fascist elements conspiring to prevent the 'will of the people' in building a socialist state in East Germany. In practice, the Wall served to prevent the massive emigration and defection that marked East Germany and the communist Eastern Bloc during the post-World War II period.

The Berlin Wall was officially referred to as the 'Anti-Fascist Protection Rampart' by GDR authorities, implying that the NATO countries and West Germany in particular were 'fascists.' The West Berlin city government sometimes referred to it as the 'Wall of Shame'—a term coined by mayor Willy Brandt—while condemning the Wall's restriction on freedom of movement. Along with the separate and much longer Inner German border (IGB), which demarcated the border between East and West Germany, it came to symbolize the 'Iron Curtain' that separated Western Europe and the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War.

Before the Wall's erection, 3.5 million East Germans circumvented Eastern Bloc emigration restrictions and defected from the GDR, many by crossing over the border from East Berlin into West Berlin, from where they could then travel to West Germany and other Western European countries. Between 1961 and 1989, the wall prevented almost all such emigration. During this period, around 5,000 people attempted to escape over the wall, with an estimated death toll of from 136 to more than 200 in and around Berlin.

In 1989, a series of radical political changes occurred in the Eastern Bloc, associated with the liberalization of the Eastern Bloc's authoritarian systems and the erosion of political power in the pro-Soviet governments in nearby Poland and Hungary. After several weeks of civil unrest, the East German government announced on 9 November 1989 that all GDR citizens could visit West Germany and West Berlin. Crowds of East Germans crossed and climbed onto the wall, joined by West Germans on the other side in a celebratory atmosphere. Over the next few weeks, euphoric people and souvenir hunters chipped away parts of the wall; the governments later used industrial equipment to remove most of what was left. Contrary to popular belief the wall's actual demolition did not begin until the summer of 1990 and was not completed until 1992. The fall of the Berlin Wall paved the way for German reunification, which was formally concluded on 3 October 1990.

The East Side Gallery is an international memorial for freedom. It is a 1.3 km long section of the Wall located near the centre of Berlin. The actual border at this point was the river Spree. The gallery is located on the so-called 'hinterland mauer', which closed the border to West Berlin.

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Founded: 1961
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Historical period: Cold War and Separation (Germany)

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User Reviews

Aidan van Mourik (33 days ago)
One of the best attractions in Berlin. Gives a lot of information about the political environment post WWII which led to the construction of the Berlin Wall. Also included stories of people who had lived in East Germany who escaped. View from the roof and the information in the park across the road was very good.
Zack Teo (36 days ago)
It's a really meaningful visit to the wall memorial. Fortunately after the wall was torn down, the country still kept quite a number of the wall as a remembrance to the oppression that was experienced during the days. One side of the wall held numerous paintings by featured local artists and the other side closer to the river were spray painted by graffiti. The experience is amazing and such an eye opener. I personally did not expect the wall to span such a long distance. And what I saw was only a fraction of the original wall, as the rest of the wall has been torn down to be brought to other countries, sold as memorabilia and used to pave roads.
James Jeremiah Soh (2 months ago)
A very good learning experience of the rich history of Berlin, sadly it was a little cold due to the rain. But nevertheless, the experience was great! If possible, start walking from the Documentation Center and start from Cluster A towards Cluster D. If you have time, do stop by a cafe called Du Bonheur (near section C and D) for a nice cup of coffee/tea and deserts! Will surely revisit in Summer!
Tene Rokdon (2 months ago)
In no other place you will have a clearer idea of how this political dispute ended up breaking a city that once stood united and strong. This is not a place to point at culprits, only to remember the victims. The events are told as they happened, without trying to convince anyone about which side was better.
Angelo Denberg (2 months ago)
Certainly a great set of memories for anyone who wants to see history firsthand. To be there absorbing the stories and facts of the times was truly moving and I felt changed by the new perspective I gained from learning the real people involved and affected. Thanks for sharing and everything you have preserved for the world.
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