Märkisches Museum

Berlin, Germany

Built between 1901 and 1908, the red brick cathedral-like complex of the Märkisches Museum holds a history of Berlin as distinctive as its residents. Instead of a straightforward history lesson, expect a variety of themed rooms that give visitors a glimpse of the life, work, and culture of Berlin.

The museum, just steps away from the banks of the river Spree, explores the at times tumultuous evolution of this historic city and the nearby Brandenburg region through coins, weapons, posters, city models, sculpture, and more. Favourites include the tour of mechanical musical instruments, presented every Sunday at 3pm, and the seven original graffiti-bedecked segments of the Berlin Wall.

Also notable is the Kaiserpanorama, in its day one of the most technologically advanced and awe-inspiring forms of entertainment. This stereoscope dating from the 1880’s offers a 3-D show of images to up to 25 people at a time. The Märkisches Museum is the headquarters of Berlin’s City Museum Foundation, which holds more than 4 million artworks and documents; on display in this neo-Gothic architectural collage is a rich sampling of this collection.

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Details

Founded: 1901-1908
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Palomares (4 months ago)
I certainly know more about Berlin than I did when I showed up...but the museum's exhibitions were not all terribly well-connected with one another. I didn't have the feeling that the chronology was very clear. There were, however, many interesting artifacts and pieces to consider. Additionally, the parts of the nonpermanent exhibition were not translated in English which was not optimal. The staff was ok, but they got annoyed by small things like closing the bathroom door and some spoke little or no English. Perhaps it's only for enthusiastic visitors? Upon reflection, I have edited my score for this museum (with another star). The collection is worth consideration, and I enjoyed the "audio guide mechanism" quite a bit.
Michelle Baldock (7 months ago)
Fascinating museum found when looking for another museum!! Staff friendly, exhibits and stories varied, informative and great introduction to Berlin and its history. The building itself is a story on its own. Needed a full day or so to do justice to it,.
Claes Uhner (8 months ago)
An interesting small museum with largely nice exhibitions. The building is also quite interesting. Well worth a visit for everyone interested in Berlin's history.
nicolas winogrodzki (8 months ago)
A very lively museum with an audio guide that personifies history artifacts and people so that they directly address the visitor and make the visit really interesting. You'll also be able to discover different objects that have marked the history of Berlin. Eventually, the staff is also really nice and available for any question. Note that the museum will be renovated in 2021 to make the visitor even more active. Look forward to it!
Ilpo L (9 months ago)
An excellent museum about Berlin. Very informative, very well presented and in an interesting building with helpful staff. Entrance fee is 7€. An audio guide in English is included - do take it. The presentation notes are also in English, but the audio guide tells additional stories. The permanent exhibition BerlinZEIT gives you so much that I had to take another day to go through it. The Courtyard Cafe helps you to take it all.
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