Märkisches Museum

Berlin, Germany

Built between 1901 and 1908, the red brick cathedral-like complex of the Märkisches Museum holds a history of Berlin as distinctive as its residents. Instead of a straightforward history lesson, expect a variety of themed rooms that give visitors a glimpse of the life, work, and culture of Berlin.

The museum, just steps away from the banks of the river Spree, explores the at times tumultuous evolution of this historic city and the nearby Brandenburg region through coins, weapons, posters, city models, sculpture, and more. Favourites include the tour of mechanical musical instruments, presented every Sunday at 3pm, and the seven original graffiti-bedecked segments of the Berlin Wall.

Also notable is the Kaiserpanorama, in its day one of the most technologically advanced and awe-inspiring forms of entertainment. This stereoscope dating from the 1880’s offers a 3-D show of images to up to 25 people at a time. The Märkisches Museum is the headquarters of Berlin’s City Museum Foundation, which holds more than 4 million artworks and documents; on display in this neo-Gothic architectural collage is a rich sampling of this collection.

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Details

Founded: 1901-1908
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Werner Colangelo (2 years ago)
One of the "secondary" museums in Berlin.... It's interesting as it covers the history of the city... Pretty good for kids with an audio tour both in English and German... You should check out the music demo where they play several of the "automated" pianos and music carts
Werner Colangelo (2 years ago)
One of the "secondary" museums in Berlin.... It's interesting as it covers the history of the city... Pretty good for kids with an audio tour both in English and German... You should check out the music demo where they play several of the "automated" pianos and music carts
Ulaspacetraveller (2 years ago)
The building itself is amazing and as interesting as the Museum ( which is also great and enlightening in many different ways)
Alex Bilsland (2 years ago)
I enjoyed this museum. The collection can be best summed up as eclectic. The collection cuts a wide swath throughout Berlin's history and I did learn things, perhaps trivial but to those better informed than me, maybe they are important. It is clearly a labour of love on the part of all the employees, most of whom may be volunteers. While not up to the standards of the museums on Museum Island, there was a lot to see and in a very interesting setting. I would recommend this museum, particularly the free audio guide. At five Euros, this is a bit of bargain compared to other museums. It is also a short walk from here to Alexanderplatz and along the way, you can spend a bit of time at the bombed out church, the ruins of the Franziskaner-KlosterKirch, and proceed to the nearby telecommunications tower (Fernsehturm).
Rokos Frangos (3 years ago)
How to engage time-poor visitors in an age of distraction and in a city with so much to see? The Märkisches Museum seems to have given serious thought to this question, and the result is their permanent exhibition that tells the history of Berlin in one hour. They have pulled it off with aplomb; the exhibits and accompanying audio guide have been put together with great care and consideration of the user experience, making even the drier parts of Berlin’s history (the early centuries) accessible and engaging. The museum is refreshingly uncrowded - a well-kept secret.
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