Estonian Maritime Museum

Tallinn, Estonia

Estonian Maritime Museum (founded 1935) is located in the cannon tower, Paks Margareeta (Fat Margaret), forming a part of medieval defence system. The exposition on the history of Estonian maritime - ship- and boat building, ports, navigational aids on the ships, lighthouses – is displayed on the four floors of the museum.

In addition to the main exposition the exchangeable exhibitions take place on the ground floor.

In the inner court historical anchors are exposed and from the roof of the tower there is a fine view over the port and Old Town.

Reference: Estonian Maritime Museum

Comments

Your name



Address

Pikk 70, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1935
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: The Independent Republic (Estonia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antti Laakso (3 years ago)
Visited in December of 2018. Turns out the museum is closed for restoration untill fall 2019
Carlos Villalobos (3 years ago)
Nice seeing it. There's a parking lot near by.... bonus!
Ekaterina Chernyavskaya (3 years ago)
Amazing museum. Worth a visit of both Fat Margaret and the Seaplane Harbour!
George On tour (3 years ago)
The Estonian Maritime Museum is the institution for collecting, preserving, studying and presenting Estonian maritime culture (maritime history). Our mission is to promote knowledge about, respect for and love of the sea. The Museum was founded in Tallinn on the initiative of former captains and sailors in 1935. During its long history, the museum has moved on a number of occasions and since 1981, its main exhibition is located in the 500-year-old Fat Margaret tower in Tallinn Old Town. In May 2012, the Maritime Museum opened another exhibition place at the Seaplane Harbour. Today, the Maritime Museum is one of the largest museums in Estonia, and the most popular one — particularly thanks to the Seaplane Harbour exhibition
Anu K (3 years ago)
Worth a trip mainly to visit the historic Fat Margaret tower. The exhibit itself is okay, but not that interesting to a casual visitor. There's a rooftop terrace where you can get a great 360 view of Tallinn and take some photos. Overall I would visit only if you are a maritime history enthusiast or have some time to kill; otherwise, the main exhibit at the Seaplane Harbour is much more worth your time.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.