Kerepesi Cemetery

Budapest, Hungary

Kerepesi Cemetery is the most famous cemetery in Budapest. Founded in 1847, it is one of the oldest cemeteries in Hungary which has been almost completely preserved as an entity.

The cemetery's first burial took place some two years after its opening, in 1849. Since then numerous Hungarian notables (statesmen, writers, sculptors, architects, artists, composers, scientists, actors and actresses etc.) have been interred there, several of them in ornate tombs or mausoleums. This was encouraged by the decision of the municipal authorities to declare Kerepesi a 'ground of honour' in 1885. The first notable burial was that of Mihály Vörösmarty in 1855.

Until the 1940s, several tombs were removed to this cemetery from others in Budapest – for example, it is the fourth resting place of the poet Attila József.

The cemetery was declared closed for burials in 1952. This was partly because it had become damaged during World War II, and partly for political reasons, as the Communist government sought to play down the graves of those who had 'exploited the working class'. At one point it was intended to build a housing estate over the cemetery. Part of the grounds were in fact handed over to a nearby rubber factory and were destroyed in 1953.

In 1958, a Mausoleum for the Labour movement was created. During the Communist period (which lasted from 1948 till 1989 in Hungary) this was the only part of the cemetery highlighted or even mentioned by the authorities. After the fall of communism, Kerepesi was still considered by some as a Communist cemetery (for example a son of Béla Bartók forbade his father's ashes to be interred there).

The Salgotarjani Street Jewish Cemetery is actually the eastern corner of the Kerepesi Cemetery, but it is separated from it by a stone wall.

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Details

Founded: 1847
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Hungary

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adam Ondráček (2 years ago)
Very interesting for foreigners also. Easy parking.
Máté Deák (2 years ago)
A big and historical cementery. A lot of famous Hungarian were buried here.
Claudia Millán Nebot (2 years ago)
Huge, really green! It is quite interesting as it has many people of historical relevance buried there, but also because of the many different mausoleums and tombs. There are some that are truly works of art.
Charlotte Girardot (2 years ago)
Quite underrated attraction (not indicated on the two maps I had), but a must see. It's both a beautiful park and a piece of Hungarian history.
Clara Youdale-Pinelli (2 years ago)
Beautiful cemetery and very peaceful. Lots of important Hungarian people are buried here. Worth going!
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