Heinsheim castle complex has been privately owned by the family von Racknitz since ca. 1720. The main building was erected in the early 18th century, wings and further farm buildings were added in the course of the centuries. It was first mentioned in 1180 in connection with their ancestral seat, Perneck Castle in Styria; in ca. 1720 the family von Racknitz gained the rule of Heinsheim, and in 1727 they acquired all pertinent rights from the Bishopric of Worms. For more than 50 years the castle has been run successfully, first as an inn and later as a hotel. The castle’s baroque chapel, the landscaped garden designed ca. 1810, its close distance to the river Neckar and its top-standard hospitality are features contributing to the distinctive charm of Heinsheim Castle.

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Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chris Tamdjidi (2 years ago)
Nice location, very friendly staff, really nice experience
David Faustino (2 years ago)
Felix is the best waiter
Exploring With Urban (2 years ago)
Great place to stay and great food in the restaurant. Staff was very nice and the rooms were very clean.
Johan Brouwer (3 years ago)
Nice manor house, modern bathrooms, good restaurant
Patty Wimpfheimer (3 years ago)
Amazing hotel and they treated us very well
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