Heinsheim castle complex has been privately owned by the family von Racknitz since ca. 1720. The main building was erected in the early 18th century, wings and further farm buildings were added in the course of the centuries. It was first mentioned in 1180 in connection with their ancestral seat, Perneck Castle in Styria; in ca. 1720 the family von Racknitz gained the rule of Heinsheim, and in 1727 they acquired all pertinent rights from the Bishopric of Worms. For more than 50 years the castle has been run successfully, first as an inn and later as a hotel. The castle’s baroque chapel, the landscaped garden designed ca. 1810, its close distance to the river Neckar and its top-standard hospitality are features contributing to the distinctive charm of Heinsheim Castle.

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Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Endre Soos (3 years ago)
This is not a metropolitan area, pretty rural. They really did their best to renew the buildings and to provide a proper service
Nigel Penistone (3 years ago)
Nice little place with a good restaurant
nikhil jajur (3 years ago)
We were a group of 24 doing our department workshop here.The highlight of this place is its restaurant.I have never had better vegetarian food in the recent times.The lasagne the ravioli was extremely tasty.
Benjamin Glaubinger (3 years ago)
Beautiful, quaint, old world bed and breakfast. One of the better hotel breakfasts I've had. I was there for a friend's wedding, and they handled the event beautifully. It's a very small town, though, so don't expect much outside the venue itself.
Peter 't Hart (4 years ago)
Very nice location with nice rooms. Staff was friendly and helpful. Food was also good (both dinner and breakfast).
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