Ehrenberg Castle dates from the early 12th century when it was built by the Counts of Lauffen. The oldest part of the wall around the main castle. The building of the main castle date from the 12th and 13th centuries. To existing keep dates from 1235. The castle was ruined in the Thirty Years' War. The new residential and farm buildings have been built in the 17th and 18th century. Today Ehrenberg is privately owned and can not be visited.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

3.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Micheal Ruttinger (13 months ago)
Alte Burg mit schöner Aussicht
Jordan Alexander (3 years ago)
Scary place. We stayed there for 2 nights. There were no lights, mud EVERYWHERE, and very rude owners. NO HOT WATER!!!! Mean dog that barked at us whenever we left. There were MICE!!! Making noises throughout the night. Also not sure if there is a ghost or not, but it sounded like people walking throughout the night. Left the place completely spotless and the owner told us that we left the place insanely dirty. Complete lie. We hand washed all the dishes and made all of the beds. Everything in the house looked EXACTLY how we found it. Never would recommend to anyone coming here. Find somewhere else to stay or else they will expect you to deep clean the place or hire a maid!! Awful experience. Never again.
Christine Alexander (3 years ago)
We stayed their 2 nights and would not stay again. We paid a non-refundable cleaning deposit and then the owner complained the kitchen was not clean when we left even though I hand washed all dishes and made sure all garbage was in garbage. Place was clean when we left but I guess he wantss to pocket cleaning deposit instead of using it to clean. The place itself is strange and I do not recommend as the owner who lives there will be all over you. No hot water first day. Not worth it.
Frank Alexander (3 years ago)
Would be a great place to stay but the owner was a jerk. We left the place clean and tidy and paid a cleaning fee, then the idiot had the nerve to say we left the place in a mess. Jerk. No hot water our first day. Just plain spooky. Find some other place! This is not somewhere you will be comfortable. You cannot walk the actual ruins. You are staying in renovated servant quarters without Wi-Fi. Owner was completely expecting us to clean the house from top to bottom even after we paid the non-refundable cleaning fee. Find some other place to stay. I do not recommend this place. Avoid it at all costs. Stay somewhere else.
rusache stere (4 years ago)
closed for public...
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