Basilica of San Zeno

Verona, Italy

The Basilica di San Zeno name rests partly on its architecture and partly upon the tradition that its crypt was the place of the marriage of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. It stands adjacent to a Benedictine abbey, both dedicated to St Zeno of Verona.

St. Zeno died in 380. According to legend, at a site above his tomb along the Via Gallica, the first small church was erected by Theodoric the Great, king of the Ostrogoths. Erection of the present basilica and associated monastery began in the 9th century, when Bishop Ratoldus and King Pepin of Italy attended the translation of the saint's relics into the new church. This edifice was damaged or destroyed by a Magyar invasion in the early 10th-century, at which time Zeno's body was moved to the Cathedral of Santa Maria Matricolare: on May 21, 921, it was returned to its original site in the crypt of the present church. In 967, a new Romanesque edifice was built by Bishop Raterius, with the patronage of Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor.

On January 3, 1117, the church, along with most of the city, was damaged by an earthquake; the church was restored and enlarged in 1138. Work was completed in 1398 with the reconstruction of the roof and of the Gothic-style apse.

Attached to the basilica is an abbey was erected in the 9th century over a pre-existing monastery. Of the original structure, destroyed in the Napoleonic Wars, only a large brick tower and the cloisters survive. It had originally another tower and the abbot's palace. For long time the abbey was the city's official residence of the Holy Roman Emperors. In the 1980s a restoration discovered frescoes from the 12th to 15th centuries.

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Details

Founded: 9th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markus Lochner (6 months ago)
Beautiful church. Fair price and nice to see
Matti “Thernöe” Lubahn (12 months ago)
Great architecture and free Audioguide (internet connection required)
Andrea Nori (12 months ago)
A very beautiful church. I recommend taking the combined ticket at a cost of €6 which also includes three other churches. It is absolutely worth it if you are in Verona
Jip Hekerman (13 months ago)
Very nice church worth seeing. The church is a short walk away from the center of the city. This might be a disadvantage to some, but for us it was an advantage since this was the least touristic sight we saw in Verona. Admission is low (3 euros) and there is a free audio guide app. Most definitely worth visiting if you don't mind a small walk :)
Casper Vranken (14 months ago)
A nice basilic, and with the promotion to visit 4 churches for 6 euros, it is very cheap to visit as well! There is a nice cafe closeby as well, but it is not as nice as the other 3 churches you can visit with the same ticket. Still recommend though!
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