Saint Gertrude's Abbey Church

Leuven, Belgium

Saint Gertrude's was an Augustine abbey, limited to 12 canons of noble descent. The church was built from the 14th to the 16th century. The tower has an openwork spire, dating from 1453. Inside is an 18th century carillon.

The abbey was closed in 1796 (during French occupation) and the buildings got other uses. In 1919 it became a Benedictine abbey. Reconstructions were carried out after the fire during World War II. The abbey grounds (compound outside the church) at present has mixed uses, and is like a little pleasant park to hang out or have a quiet rest.

During the second world war, the church (as many others in Leuven) was seriously damaged. The artistic choir stalls seemed beyond repair. Fortunately photographs existed. After the war, the stalls were recreated by sculptors, who did an excellent job. The choir with its many wooden sculptures is now one of Leuven's most outstanding works of art. One can distinguish between original parts and later parts by judging the colors of the wood, the older parts being darker.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

www.discoverleuven.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juraj Mieres (2 years ago)
Who is looking for a english speaking comunity in Belgium is on the right place. The church of St. Kvintin is museum of classical art and place of worship...
Robert Idewa (2 years ago)
Such a wonderful community
Kuangjen Wang (3 years ago)
Beautiful structures
Gloria Frost (3 years ago)
Beautiful church with a very vibrant and friendly community.
Nissy Nevil (3 years ago)
Beautiful church with mass at 6:00 pm on Weekdays and mass at 9.00 am on Sunday.
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