Church of Our Lady-across-the-Dyle

Mechelen, Belgium

Church of Our Lady-across-the-Dyle was built in the 14th and 15th centuries on the site where Mechelen's first parish church probably stood. The tower contains a complete carillon with no fewer than 49 bells. The Dyle church houses some wonderful art treasures. Rubens painted a work for this church just as he had done for St John's. The fishmongers commissioned him to illustrate the wealth of their guild as they had done by building 'De Grooten Zalm' on the Zoutwerf. The large triptych entitled 'The miraculous draught of fishes' tells the story of the same name from the Bible. The fourteenth-century sculpture 'Our Lady with the Crooked Hip' is one of the glories of the church. It is the only free-standing sculpture in Mechelen from that period and it takes its name from Mary's characteristic stance.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

toerisme.mechelen.be

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

julee varghese (5 years ago)
Butiful chuch amidst the market, church top is very nice... One time go atleast
Wouter Roosen (5 years ago)
Deceptively big and worthy to be amongst the 7 nicest/ most meaningful churches in the city. Very informative bits of video to expand on some of its history.
Zacharias M. T (5 years ago)
Very good
Clara W (5 years ago)
Very interesting organ.
fons fraters (5 years ago)
Mooie akoestiek
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