Church of Our Lady-across-the-Dyle

Mechelen, Belgium

Church of Our Lady-across-the-Dyle was built in the 14th and 15th centuries on the site where Mechelen's first parish church probably stood. The tower contains a complete carillon with no fewer than 49 bells. The Dyle church houses some wonderful art treasures. Rubens painted a work for this church just as he had done for St John's. The fishmongers commissioned him to illustrate the wealth of their guild as they had done by building 'De Grooten Zalm' on the Zoutwerf. The large triptych entitled 'The miraculous draught of fishes' tells the story of the same name from the Bible. The fourteenth-century sculpture 'Our Lady with the Crooked Hip' is one of the glories of the church. It is the only free-standing sculpture in Mechelen from that period and it takes its name from Mary's characteristic stance.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

toerisme.mechelen.be

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

fons fraters (2 years ago)
Mooie akoestiek
Griet Peters (2 years ago)
Mooie kerk met prachtige lichtinval door de glas-in-loodramen,die zelf meer dan de moeite zijn om te bekijken. De kerk is overdag toegankelijk. Je vindt er ook rust en stilte. In de kerk komt een levendige parochie samen, met prachtige en krachtige liturgie...
Abc Oude (2 years ago)
mooi vooral omdat alles zo oud is. houtwerk erg mooi
Jan Proost (3 years ago)
Gratis toegang Alle dagen open (behalve woensdag) vanaf 13u
Ramunė Vaičiulytė (3 years ago)
Well, beautiful ancient church, but the problem is its working hours - you cannot get inside when you want. I was not lucky to see - as I heard - beautiful interior and also felt the distance from that church as God house...
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