Castle of the Princes de Mérode

Westerlo, Belgium

Castle of the Princes de Mérode, also called as 'old castle', has been the home of the House of Merode since more than five centuries. The central keep or Donjon was built in local brown stone in the 14th-century. It probably replaced an older fortress on the same spot. Other parts of the building date from the 16th century. The castle was adapted, extended and restorated several times. From the 16th century onwards it was transformed into a more luxurious noble dwelling and gradually lost its fortified character. Several restorations in the 19th century gave it back a more romantic medieval appearance.

The sumptuous interiors contain fine furniture, paintings, tapestries, and objects collected by the Merode family throughout the centuries. The most important rooms like the entrance hall, the knights hall, the large drawing room, the dining room and the chapel can be visited during the 'Kasteelfeesten' in the first weekend of July.

An English landscape park of 12 hectares surrounds the castle. The ponds in the park are connected with the moat of the castle. Across the Nete river there is a larger formal park (60 hectares) in the French tradition with a rectangular pond forming a large perspective. It was commissioned by Fieldmarshall Jean-Philippe-Eugène de Mérode-Westerloo at the beginning of the 18th century and was inspired by Versailles.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nora Frenken (2 years ago)
Heb er de musical "Albert I" gezien . Tijdens de zomer prachtig om er met de fiets te rijden in de mooie natuur. En Simon de Merode is een vriendelijke kasteelheer. Hij laat iedereen mee genieten van het kasteel, de musicals en de natuur rondom
Ludo Vossen (3 years ago)
Leuk, maar uitsluitend gericht op kinderen. Dat hadden we liever vooraf geweten. Dan hadden we de kleinzoons uitgenodigd en hadden ook wij er echt van genoten.
Stefan Geerts (3 years ago)
Tijdens de kerstmagie op het kasteel geweest, was weer een leuk toneel en gezellig ingericht. Wel spijtig dat er buiten minder te beleven viel.
Sophie's Foodie Files (3 years ago)
Beautiful nature park situated around de Grote Nete. Lovely beautiful castle! A must!
Aline Cardoso (3 years ago)
There is a wall and a gate so there was not much left to see..
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