San Anton Palace

Attard, Malta

San Anton Palace is the official residence of the President of Malta, and is surrounded by both private and public gardens.

The San Anton Palace and its gardens owe their origin to the Knight Antoine de Paule, a French knight from the Langue de Provence, who was elected 54th Grand Master of the Order of St. John in 1623. As Grand Master, de Paule, who also founded Paola in 1626, acquired a sizeable plot of land near Attard and set about building a country villa which was nearer to Valletta than Verdala Palace.

He planned the villa on generous proportions so as to provide accommodation for his guests and for his large domestic staff which included cooks, food tasters, torch bearers, pantry boys, wig makers, a winder of the clocks, and physicians, as well as a baker to make black bread for feeding his hunting dogs. The Grand Master named the villa ‘Sainte Antoine’ after his patron saint, Anthony of Padua.

De Paule also provided the palace with a private chapel dedicated to the Madonna del Pilar with a vault decorated with the coats-of-arms of Grand Masters especially Emmanuel de Rohan-Polduc. De Paule also designed a symmetrical plan to the garden that consisted of more orange groves in the beginning. These oranges, he sent as gifts to those he desired to honour. A mausoleum dedicated to Grand Master de Paule may be found at St. John's Co-Cathedral in Valletta in the Chapel of the Langue of Provence.

Successive Grand Masters were to use the place as their country-residence. After the French occupation of Malta and the Maltese rebellion, the Palace was the seat of the Maltese National Assembly from February 1799 to the departure of the French in September 1800. It was later to become the residence of the Governor and of the Governor-General of Malta. Since 1974 Sant'Anton Palace has been the Official residence of the President of Malta.

Her Royal Highness Princess Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha was born at the Palace on 25 November 1876. Victoria Melita was a granddaughter of British Monarch Queen Victoria and Albert, Prince Consort, through their son the British Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh and Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, so Melita was legally a British princess in her own right.

The gardens of San Anton, part of which have been open to the public since 1882, are laid out in a formal manner, with graceful walkways, sculptures, ornamental ponds, families of ducks and swans, and a small aviary.

The gardens contain a large variety of trees and flowers from around the world, including a variety of palm trees, cypress, jacarandas, araucarias and other exotic plants, some of them over three centuries old. For many years it has been customary for visiting Heads of State to plant a tree in memory of their stay in Malta. The gardens also contain an orangery, and it was once the practice of incumbent Governors to give baskets of oranges grown in the palace gardens as gifts at Christmas time.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Malta

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sandra Sammut-Alessi (20 months ago)
Beautiful garden.... very well taken care of ..... Some very old trees... orange trees.... lovely colourful flowers
Teenie Ribenie (20 months ago)
Nice gardens. Came across them on the hop on, hop off bus. Well worth a visit.
Sharon Crosland (2 years ago)
Always a nice place to visit. I’ve been at least half a dozen times before but only just realised there’s a maze here! Small by Hampton Court standards but still fun. My little dog likes to visit the animals in the kitchen gardens too.
Marija Demanuele (2 years ago)
Lovely gardens. Well manicured and lovely duck pond. Great for relaxing time with my toddler or to read books.
Shelagh MçCormick (2 years ago)
Beautiful place. Loads of different trees and plants. Information about them at each site. Loved the turtles and peacocks. Pity the kitchen wasn't open but friends said the meals are lovely there and you can buy some produce there.
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