St. Augustine's Monastery

Erfurt, Germany

The church and monastery of the Augustinian hermits in Erfurt was built around 1300. Martin Luther, the famous Augustinian monk, was admitted to the monastery on 17 July 1505. The Augustinian Monastery pays tribute to Martin Luther with a new exhibition. The Lutherzelle (Luther's cell) can be visited as part of the exhibition. Since 1988 the monastery has been used as an ecumenical conference centre and a memorial to Luther.

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Address

Kirchgasse 4, Erfurt, Germany
See all sites in Erfurt

Details

Founded: 1300
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Es Pr (7 months ago)
Beautiful, worth a visit.
CJ Fitzsimons (8 months ago)
Very comfortable, well appointed rooms.
Anders Heide Wallberg (2 years ago)
Great place. The hotel is somewhat expensive, but living in one of the biggest attractions in Erfurt and enjoying the monastery courtyard is worth it. Reception closes early, but lock boxes are available
Erik Malling (2 years ago)
Very cool place! Worth a visit
Scott Moore (3 years ago)
A significant historical site. It was here that Martin Luther entered the monastery. Here in this church, he also said his first mass.
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