Monserrate Palace

Sintra, Portugal

The Monserrate Palace is an exotic palatial villa located near Sintra, the traditional summer resort of the Portuguese court.

It was restored in 1858 for Sir Francis Cook, an English baronet created Viscount of Monserrate by King Luís I. The design was influenced by Romanticism and Mudéjar Moorish Revival architecture with Neo-Gothic elements. The eclecticism is a fine example of the Sintra Romanticism, along with other nearby palácios, such as the Pena Palace and the Quinta do Relógio. The Islamic architectural influence is in reference to when the region was a part of the wider Muslim Gharb Al-Andalus until the 13th century.

The terrace leads out into the large park. It is designed in a romantic style with a lake, several springs and fountains, grottoes, and is surrounded by lush greenery with rare species.

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Details

Founded: 1858
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Portugal

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cecilia Torres (13 months ago)
A must visit when in Sintra. The Palace is stunning. It blends Gothic, Arab and Indian influences. The Music Room and the Central Atrium are stunning. And the Park is great to explore with its themed gardens. We strolled through the Fern Valley onto the ruins of a Chapel, then to the Mexican Garden and finally the Rose Garden before we visited the Palace. We stopped to marvel at the great diversity of the plants and show many curiosities to our young son, such as unusual mushrooms and vegetation.
Юлия Шамарина (15 months ago)
Very nice place to walk, enjoy nature and beautiful architecture
Bartłomiej Kukuczka (15 months ago)
Pleasant place to visit, really nice palace but not so monumental like Pena palace. Surrounded by tematical gardens, a bit dried in September.
Yong Chiang Kang (19 months ago)
Beautiful gardens and architecture. minimal furnishings inside Palace.. Perfect for our engagement photoshoot. 7 years ago and still looking through the beautiful photos reminiscing the place.
Shu Guice (21 months ago)
The most beautiful palace and garden. Truely one of a kind you must visit and spend time there. The dome shaped piano room is so impressive and it absolutely blows my pianist daughter away - what a wonderful time and privilege to live in that place and that time. Today's billionaires could not build something more elegant as such no matter how much money they have.
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