Monserrate Palace

Sintra, Portugal

The Monserrate Palace is an exotic palatial villa located near Sintra, the traditional summer resort of the Portuguese court.

It was restored in 1858 for Sir Francis Cook, an English baronet created Viscount of Monserrate by King Luís I. The design was influenced by Romanticism and Mudéjar Moorish Revival architecture with Neo-Gothic elements. The eclecticism is a fine example of the Sintra Romanticism, along with other nearby palácios, such as the Pena Palace and the Quinta do Relógio. The Islamic architectural influence is in reference to when the region was a part of the wider Muslim Gharb Al-Andalus until the 13th century.

The terrace leads out into the large park. It is designed in a romantic style with a lake, several springs and fountains, grottoes, and is surrounded by lush greenery with rare species.

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Details

Founded: 1858
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Portugal

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ECA (11 months ago)
It might not be as famous as its' neighbour (Pena Palace) but if you have time it worths a visit. The garden is even better than the one in Pena. There are not so many people (I visited in March) and no queue at all. There is small cafeteria that serves simple but nice food.
Jody Du (11 months ago)
This place is absolutely breathtaking. Take some time (an hour or more) to wander the grounds before heading into the manor. If you're headed to Sintra, this is a must-see.
Martin De Bruin (12 months ago)
Park and palace monserrate a beautiful place to visit for youngsters and adults. A well maintained garden with a large variety of plants and trees. The palace is very well restored. Lots of photo opportunities inside as well outside. The park has a couple of lanes with inclination but for those with less condition a solar hop on hop of bus is available.
Natalia Poltorak (12 months ago)
Absolutely loved it.. incredible little palace, the details of architecture were breathtaking for me. Even though I went in January I have fully enjoyed - gardens are amazing I can only imagine what they are like in summer!!!
William Spencer (13 months ago)
A fabulous place to visit. Huge gardens. Incredible house. Way more calm than Pena Palace. Plan on 2-3 hours to fully explore the gardens.
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