Igreja de Santa Maria

Sintra, Portugal

The parish of Santa Maria de Sintra dates back to the time of Portugal’s foundation as a nation, when Dom Afonso Henriques, the first king of Portugal, conquered Sintra from the Moors. At that time, a small chapel was built here, later reconstructed in the 13th century by the prior Martim Dade.

The great earthquake of 1755 caused serious damage to the church, but the original Gothic portico survived, displaying the Renaissance features that correspond to alterations made in the 14th century.

Inside, the attention of visitors is drawn to the medieval decoration of the capitals and the painted and panelled vault of the ceiling, the Manueline font, a Renaissance stoup and an excellent 17th-century painted and gilded statue of Our Lady of the Conception.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marta Cranmer (17 months ago)
Bonita
Luis Quaresma (2 years ago)
Muito bonita e com história, zona envolvente espetacular, Sintra!
Tiago Nunes (2 years ago)
Igreja bonita mas de acesso difícil usando o automóvel em dias de casamento.
Sissy Sissy (2 years ago)
Chiesa davvero molto bella
Rui Santos Lóio (2 years ago)
O regresso ao seculo XVIII
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