Musée Réattu

Arles, France

Musée Réattu is an art museum in Arles, housing paintings, including works by Arles-born painter Jacques Réattu, drawings by Picasso, as well as sculptures and a large collection of photographs.

The museum is housed in the former Grand Priory of the Order of Malta, built in the late 15th century. The building was acquired in 27 parts between 1796 and 1827 by Jacques Réattu, who lived and worked there. Upon his death in 1833, Réattu's daughter Élisabeth Grange inherited the building and her father's collections. The Museum was officially created in 1868, initially featuring the collections and the works of Jacques Réattu. In the 1950s, at the time of the renovations of the building, modern art began entering the collections. Initiated by Lucien Clergue and Jean-Maurice Rouquette in 1965, the foundation of the department of photography was the first of its kind in an arts museum in France. In 1971, Pablo Picasso donated 57 of his recent drawings to the Musée Réattu.

The museum owns 800 paintings and drawings by Jacques Réattu. Twelve exhibition rooms are dedicated to his own works, his collections (mainly 17th century paintings), as well as works by friends, relatives and collaborators, like The Couturiers workshop painted by his uncle Antoine Raspal in the 1780s. Three rooms are dedicated to Picasso and one room to photography. The collections also include contemporary sculptures by César, Richier, Bourdelle, Zadkine and modern paintings by Dufy, Vlaminck and Prassinos, among others.

The collection of photographs comprised over 4,000 works in 2001. Initial gifts by photographers including Richard Avedon, Cecil Beaton, Man Ray, Peter Beard, Werner Bischof, Izis, William Klein and Jean Dieuzaide, as well as by collectors, were followed from 1970 onwards by photographs donated by the artists attending the Rencontres d'Arles.

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Details

Founded: 1868
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vange Shrubb (3 years ago)
Lovely paintings, cool on a hot day. Great photos too.
Yinon Ctc (3 years ago)
A great museum, especially the Picasso collection and the photography part.
T E (3 years ago)
Well worth a visit, a nice Museum/Gallery with very interesting things to see. Get the combination ticket to see this and the Van Gogh Foundation.
operacha (3 years ago)
Not worth it. Skip and go to the Van Gogh Foundation instead. I did want to buy a postcard but the cashier was in a very loud conversation on the phone. I waited, she saw me but never even acknowledged me. If I hadn’t needed change, I’d left the money. Instead, walked out without buying the card.
anasuya ray (3 years ago)
A small homely museum tucked in a book and yet features some selectable collections in a lovely rampart. Loved my visit.
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