Neugebäude Palace

Vienna, Austria

Neugebäude Palace is a large Mannerist castle complex in the Simmering dictrict of Vienna, Austria. It was built from 1569 onwards at the behest of the Habsburg emperor Maximilian II on the alleged site of Sultan Suleiman's tent city during the 1529 Siege of Vienna and apparently modeled after it.

It fell into disuse already in the 17th century and today stands in ruins. Under monumental protection since the 1970s, there are various efforts to restore the site.

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Details

Founded: 1569
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

U Will (6 months ago)
An old renaissance building where a former Austrian king lived a while. Used as a location for different events. In the front area there are some streetkitchen and a bar and you can sit outside there in summer.
SIRUS VIRUS (9 months ago)
Cool
vicky Gear (9 months ago)
Great piece of History in the City. Fun medieval festival
Riddick Austria (10 months ago)
Sommer Feeling
Martin Neuwirth (3 years ago)
nice place with different style events all year around. spring festival, medieval festival, Halloween, Christmas market and much more. not to forget the open air summer movie theatre. only negative thing about that is that all movies are only in german!
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