Neugebäude Palace

Vienna, Austria

Neugebäude Palace is a large Mannerist castle complex in the Simmering dictrict of Vienna, Austria. It was built from 1569 onwards at the behest of the Habsburg emperor Maximilian II on the alleged site of Sultan Suleiman's tent city during the 1529 Siege of Vienna and apparently modeled after it.

It fell into disuse already in the 17th century and today stands in ruins. Under monumental protection since the 1970s, there are various efforts to restore the site.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1569
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Austria

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Patrick Albrecht (2 years ago)
Any ohech otach
Andrejs Kostenko (2 years ago)
Just for walk outside in the garden!
Alex Grig (2 years ago)
Now seems to only be used for the covid test station. The garden in the back serves as a playground for immigrants
Michael Kubik (ミク miku) (3 years ago)
Wonderful!
shakyasingha chakraborty (4 years ago)
Nice place, the Mittelalter Fest took place here. It was awesome experience. Very near to the Central cemetery of Vienna, beside the pet cemetery.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls

The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls was part of the federal sanctuary of the three Gauls dedicated to the cult of Rome and Augustus celebrated by the 60 Gallic tribes when they gathered at Lugdunum (Lyon). The amphitheatre was built at the foot of the La Croix-Rousse hill at what was then the confluence of the Rhône and Saône.

Excavations have revealed a basement of three elliptical walls linked by cross-walls and a channel surrounding the oval central arena. The arena was slightly sloped, with the building"s south part supported by a now-vanished vault. The arena"s dimensions are 67,6m by 42m. This phase of the amphitheatre housed games which accompanied the imperial cult, with its low capacity (1,800 seats) being enough for delegations from the 60 Gallic tribes.

The amphitheatre was expanded at the start of the 2nd century. Two galleries were added around the old amphitheatre, raising its width from 25 metres to 105 metres and its capacity to about 20,000 seats. In so doing it made it a building open to the whole population of Lugdunum and its environs.