Nanno Castle

Nanno, Italy

Nanno Castle wass mentioned first time in 1264. The current appearance dates mainly from the restoration made between 1520-1530. The square building is surrounded with a wall and thtree turrets. Today Nanno castle is privately owned and not open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.trentino.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maura Zola (11 months ago)
Unfortunately the castle is not very well kept ... not even the garden. The rooms to visit are very few, no furniture, no exhibitions. Ticket price too high. Sin
Giovanni Bonoli (13 months ago)
Castello della Val di Non of which only the walls and the structure remain, if you are passing through it is worth stopping otherwise there are still more beautiful castles in the area. Visits are allowed only on Saturdays and Sundays. For the visit it is advisable to call the tourist office in which it is possible to book it, It is advisable to buy the ticket for Castel valer and Castel and Castello inganno at the same time so you do one in the morning and the other in the afternoon.
Niccolò Bignamini (13 months ago)
Well maintained castle. It deserves more than a look
Alfredo Pascual (13 months ago)
Interesting castle. Audio guide was good. Beautiful garden. But there's not a lot to see inside the building so don't expect to spend much time visiting.
Nicola Sancisi (13 months ago)
Nice castle among the apple orchards, with a simple but pleasant interior garden with various fruit trees. It is a pity that the castle is practically bare inside and various rooms cannot be visited. The visit is still pleasant, even if the cost is perhaps slightly high for what is offered.
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