Venetian Ghetto

Venice, Italy

The Venetian Ghetto was the area of Venice in which Jews were compelled to live under the Venetian Republic. The English word 'ghetto' is derived from the Jewish ghetto in Venice, originating from the Venetian ghèto and Italian ghetto.

The Venetian Ghetto was instituted on 29 March 1516, though political restrictions on Jewish rights and residences existed before that date. In 1797 the French army of Italy, commanded by the 28-year-old General Napoleon Bonaparte, conquered Venice, dissolved the Venetian republic, and ended the ghetto's separation from the city. In the 19th century, the ghetto was renamed the Contrada dell'unione.

The Ghetto is an area of the Cannaregio sestiere of Venice, divided into the Ghetto Nuovo ('New Ghetto'), and the adjacent Ghetto Vecchio ('Old Ghetto'). These names of the ghetto sections are misleading, as they refer to an older and newer site at the time of their use by the foundries: in terms of Jewish residence, the Ghetto Nuovo is actually older than the Ghetto Vecchio.

Today, the Ghetto is still a center of Jewish life in the city. The Jewish Community of Venice. There is also a yeshiva, several Judaica shops, and a Chabad synagogue run by Chabad of Venice. Although only few of the roughly 500 Venetian Jews still live in the Ghetto, many return there during the day for religious services in the two synagogues which are still used (the other three are only used for guided tours, offered by the Jewish Community Museum).

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Address

Calesele 2910, Venice, Italy
See all sites in Venice

Details

Founded: 1516
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christian Brundu (17 months ago)
Quite good. Good info in English. Dont go of you dont speak English
Rebecca Davis (17 months ago)
Very sad but incredibly insightful. Definitely worth a visit.
Ian Pitt (18 months ago)
Very interesting museum , but not the best in town. It worth to pay for the tour guide. Just they were pretty rude. The kosher spritz at the bar it didn’t taste good at all.
Noel Ceta (18 months ago)
The museum is interesting, however there are much better museums to visit in Venice. So if you are here just for a few days, spend your time elsewhere.
Zoe Man (2 years ago)
Interesting, especially if you've paid for the tour guide to take you into the synagogues. But if you haven't got the time it's better to visit the other attractions first before you walk over to the ghetto. Maybe an hour or two will do here.
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