Church of the Hermits

Padua, Italy

The Church of the Eremitani, or Church of the Hermits, is an Augustinian church of the 13th century. It was built in 1276 and dedicated to the saints Philip and James; it is however best known as degli Eremitani from the annexed old monastery, which now houses the municipal art gallery.

The chapel of SS. James and Christopher (Ovetari Chapel), formerly illustrated by Mantegna's frescoes, was largely destroyed by the Allies in World War II, because it was next to a German headquarters. There are more than 88000 fragments covering only 77 m2, while the original area covered several hundreds. Other artists whose frescoes are preserved in the church include Guariento and Ansuino da Forlì.

The church contains the tombs of Jacopo II da Carrara (d.1351) and Ubertino da Carrara (d.1345) da Carrara, lords of Padua, both by Andriolo de Santi (de Sanctis) and others. They were formerly in the church of Sant'Agostino, but were moved here after that church was razed in 1819.

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Address

Piazza Eremitani 9, Padua, Italy
See all sites in Padua

Details

Founded: 1276
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tony Popa (17 months ago)
Frumos. Istorie, arta, credință. The church was built in 1276 and dedicated to the saints Philip and James; it is however best known as degli Eremitani from the annexed old monastery, the Musei Civici agli Eremitani, which now houses the municipal archeology and art gallery. The chapel of SS. James and Christopher (Ovetari Chapel), formerly illustrated by Mantegna's frescoes, was largely destroyed by the Allies in World War II, because it was next to a German headquarters. There are more than 88000 fragments covering only 77 m2, while the original area covered several hundreds. Other artists whose frescoes are preserved in the church include Guariento and Ansuino da Forlì. The church contains the tombs of Jacopo II da Carrara (d.1351) and Ubertino da Carrara (d.1345) da Carrara, lords of Padua, both by Andriolo de Santi (de Sanctis) and others. They were formerly in the church of Sant'Agostino, but were moved here after that church was razed in 1819.
Stefano Bruno (17 months ago)
Wonderfull amcient church with Mantegna's paints and a large wood square ceiling
Simone Benaglia (2 years ago)
Art, whatever it may be, has the ability to eternalize the human soul. It excites, disturbs, interprets and persuades. And seeing her abused, forgotten, ruined hurts. Seeing a masterpiece struck by the madness of the devastation is shocking, and it makes one think. Follow the beauty, seek the sublime, preserve the work of those who have succeeded in interpreting the truth behind reality... The church was hit heavily by an Anglo-American air raid in 1944.
Raffaele Pannisco (2 years ago)
Work in progress, so the outside is not fully visible. The inside is beautiful
Miroslav Maric (2 years ago)
Off the side of Prato a large church with lovely images and sculptures. Beneath the current church some remains of an older church can be seen in the crypt.
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