Church of the Hermits

Padua, Italy

The Church of the Eremitani, or Church of the Hermits, is an Augustinian church of the 13th century. It was built in 1276 and dedicated to the saints Philip and James; it is however best known as degli Eremitani from the annexed old monastery, which now houses the municipal art gallery.

The chapel of SS. James and Christopher (Ovetari Chapel), formerly illustrated by Mantegna's frescoes, was largely destroyed by the Allies in World War II, because it was next to a German headquarters. There are more than 88000 fragments covering only 77 m2, while the original area covered several hundreds. Other artists whose frescoes are preserved in the church include Guariento and Ansuino da Forlì.

The church contains the tombs of Jacopo II da Carrara (d.1351) and Ubertino da Carrara (d.1345) da Carrara, lords of Padua, both by Andriolo de Santi (de Sanctis) and others. They were formerly in the church of Sant'Agostino, but were moved here after that church was razed in 1819.

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Address

Piazza Eremitani 9, Padua, Italy
See all sites in Padua

Details

Founded: 1276
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

silvio garola (11 months ago)
One of the best monument of the city
Alexander Wittek (2 years ago)
Very nice and interesting
robbierunciman (2 years ago)
Large space with epic statuary. The fresco are in recesses and almost take you by surprise There are parts missing but good Church is massive and still in use.
Luca Bellucci Sessa (2 years ago)
Beautiful gothic Church where you can see one of the masterpiece or the Renaissance: a fresco by Andrea Mantegna depicting the martydom or Saint Christopher, in the Ovetari chapel on the right nave. Despite being nearly destroyed during WW2 bombing It was partly restored in all its magnificent beauty, really awe-striking If you ain't seen Mantegna you can't understand the true Essence of Italy.
Oleg Naumov (3 years ago)
You can find here frescoes of Andrea Mantegna. Alas, they damaged because of allied air bombardment in 1944. There are always several tombs of XIV-XV centuries. Admission is free but any donation is welcomed and highly appreciated. Visitors are allowed to take non commercial photo without flash light.
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