Villa Melzi d'Eril

Bellagio, Italy

Villa Melzi d’Eril was created as the summer residence of Francesco Melzi d’Eril, vice president of the Italian Republic that was founded by Napoleon in the early 1800s. Located in Bellagio, this vast complex is one of the most popular attractions among tourists who visit the Pearl of Lake Como.

Unfortunately, Villa Melzi is not open to the public but you can visit its gardens, designed by architect Luigi Canonica and agronomist Luigi Villoresi. Experience a fascinating walk in the Villa Melzi gardens, and enjoy the perfect balance between architecture and natural beauty.

The Villa Melzi gardens are preserved with great care by the family Gallarati Scotti, the current owners. A long avenue of plane trees begins at the landing of the boats. Gardens of azaleas and gigantic rhododendrons surround the villa, enclosing small spaces such as the hidden cave or the artificial pond in Japanese style. In the Orangery adjacent to the villa there is a small museum, which exhibits Napoleonic memorabilia, evidence of Duke Francesco Melzi d’Eril’s loyalty to Napoleon.

The Villa Melzi gardens also have many exotic and rare plants which alternate with secular trees, big camellia hedges, and many other plant species.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1808
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

lakecomotravel.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amol Raorane (18 months ago)
A beautiful, quaint garden in a small hamlet in Bellagio. Acres of well manicured lawns are dotted with colorful flower plants and Gothic structures and a villa. It's kissed by the gentle waves of Lake Como on one side and rises up on a hilly slope on the other.
Darius Vincze (19 months ago)
How was it? Closed. It was closed. Beautiful through the fence though...
Paul Beckman (21 months ago)
Pretty walk along the lake, with some interesting and large tree specimens, a small Japanese garden. Three stars because it seems a bit overpriced for its size and extent. There is a decent guide sheet that had some inaccuracies.
Megan Balot (2 years ago)
Lovely botanical garden. My fiancé proposed here so it is now one of my favorite places in the world! All bias aside, I recommend walking the gardens. Go way before sunset - they close kinda early.
Russell Marsh (2 years ago)
Beautiful gardens. I was expecting something bigger but I guess there is not that much space but the whole area is lovely. Easy to go have a look around and then you can pop back into town for brunch and a glass of vino.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.