Villa Melzi d'Eril

Bellagio, Italy

Villa Melzi d’Eril was created as the summer residence of Francesco Melzi d’Eril, vice president of the Italian Republic that was founded by Napoleon in the early 1800s. Located in Bellagio, this vast complex is one of the most popular attractions among tourists who visit the Pearl of Lake Como.

Unfortunately, Villa Melzi is not open to the public but you can visit its gardens, designed by architect Luigi Canonica and agronomist Luigi Villoresi. Experience a fascinating walk in the Villa Melzi gardens, and enjoy the perfect balance between architecture and natural beauty.

The Villa Melzi gardens are preserved with great care by the family Gallarati Scotti, the current owners. A long avenue of plane trees begins at the landing of the boats. Gardens of azaleas and gigantic rhododendrons surround the villa, enclosing small spaces such as the hidden cave or the artificial pond in Japanese style. In the Orangery adjacent to the villa there is a small museum, which exhibits Napoleonic memorabilia, evidence of Duke Francesco Melzi d’Eril’s loyalty to Napoleon.

The Villa Melzi gardens also have many exotic and rare plants which alternate with secular trees, big camellia hedges, and many other plant species.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1808
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

lakecomotravel.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M Madinina (6 months ago)
It was named the most beautiful garden of Italy in 2016 and it deserve the label. It is a must do in Bellagio. Such a beautiful, peaceful place. The view is simply stunning. There is a museum. Plants have labels to identify their names and origins.
June Yan (6 months ago)
Very beautiful and well maintained garden, I went shortly after the gates opened but it does eventually get quite a bit busier. Lovely views of the lake!
Paule Santos (6 months ago)
Well maintained garden. Its beautiful and has some nice views in the elevated areas but I liked the garden in Villa Monastero at Varenna a little more. Still a good place to take a stroll though! Its also a Bit more peaceful here.
Chloe (6 months ago)
Lovely well maintained gardens with excellent information to aid the experience. I was expecting more flowers, however there was mostly trees. The museum was informative with easily digestible reading. Great views overlooking lake Como.
Victoria K. (8 months ago)
One of the most beautiful places and gardens I’ve seen. It’s clean, the staff is constantly working to keep it gorgeous. Definitely worth a visit. I enjoyed very much taking a walk in the garden.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Tyniec Abbey

Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.