Cimitero Monumentale di Milano

Milan, Italy

The Cimitero Monumentale is one of the two largest cemeteries in Milan, the other one being the Cimitero Maggiore. It is noted for the abundance of artistic tombs and monuments.

Designed by the architect Carlo Maciachini (1818–1899), it was planned to consolidate a number of small cemeteries that used to be scattered around the city into a single location.

Officially opened in 1866, it has since then been filled with a wide range of contemporary and classical Italian sculptures as well as Greek temples, elaborate obelisks, and other original works such as a scaled-down version of the Trajan's Column. Many of the tombs belong to noted industrialist dynasties, and were designed by artists such as Adolfo Wildt, Giò Ponti, Arturo Martini, Dante Parini, Lucio Fontana, Medardo Rosso, Giacomo Manzù, Floriano Bodini, and Giò Pomodoro.

The main entrance is through the large Famedio, a massive Hall of Fame-like Neo-Medieval style building made of marble and stone that contains the tombs of some of the city's and the country's most honored citizens, including that of novelist Alessandro Manzoni.

The Civico Mausoleo Palanti designed by the architect Mario Palanti is a tomb built for meritorious 'Milanesi', or citizens of Milan. The memorial of about 800 Milanese killed in Nazi concentration camps is located in the center and is the work of the group BBPR, formed by leading exponents of Italian rationalist architecture that included Gianluigi Banfi.

The cemetery has a special section for those who do not belong to the Catholic religion and a Jewish section.

Near the entrance there is a permanent exhibition of prints, photographs, and maps outlining the cemetery's historical development. It includes two battery-operated electric hearses built in the 1920s.

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Details

Founded: 1866
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Louise Joy (14 months ago)
Cimitero Monumentale di Milano is visually stunning - a very beautiful and peaceful place that you can easily get lost in, trawling around for hours and enjoying its beauty. There's something wonderful to look at around every corner - and there's also free public bathrooms on site!
ECHOofTHEmoon (14 months ago)
I felt like I was in a museum. I was impressed by the beautiful, unique sculptures. Simply amazing!
Magali Féret (15 months ago)
Wonderfull place to walk and think. Incredible tomb. A nice place to be in Milan. Just in front of. A girl who sell great food.
Viorel Ciuna (18 months ago)
The Monumental Cemetery in Milan is like an open air museum. The art with which the mausoleums and the sculptures that accompany them were built is soothed by their beauty. I visited this cemetery one summer day. The cemetery closed at 17.00, but I had not read the program at the entrance, so the sun was still high in the sky, I did not realize that I could be closed there. But the program was a program and had to be respected and probably no one detected my presence there, so I remained locked between the graves. Of course, I managed to jump the fence and leave, but I had already made a plan how to stay there.
Anannya Uberoi (20 months ago)
One of my favorite experienced in Milan. Came here in the morning so it was not very busy. The sculptures are detailed to the full forms, and each tombstone carries its own trademark piece. The gardens, small tombs, the building, all very composite and definitive, make this place a must visit.
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