Aquileia Roman Ruins

Aquileia, Italy

Today, Aquileia is a town smaller than the colony first founded by Rome. Over the centuries, sieges, earthquakes, floods, and pillaging of the ancient buildings for materials means that no edifices of the Roman period remain above ground. The site of Aquileia, believed to be the largest Roman city yet to be excavated, is inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Excavations, however, have revealed some of the layout of the Roman town such as a segment of a street, the north-west angle of the town walls, the river port, and the former locations of baths, of an amphitheater, of a Circus, of a cemetery, of the Via Sacra, of the forum, and of a market. The National Archaeological Museum contains over 2,000 inscriptions, statues and other antiquities, mosaics, as well as glasses of local production and a numismatics collection.

The most striking remains of the Roman city are those of the port installations, a long row of warehouses and quays that stretch along the bank of the river. These were incorporated into the 4th century defences, substantial traces of which can be seen today.

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Details

Founded: 181 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

whc.unesco.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrea Dalla Francesca Cappello (19 months ago)
Piccola area archeologica, ad ingresso libero, contenente i resti di antiche tombe romane. Merita una passeggiata ed una visita soprattutto in periodi poco affollati di turisti.
gaetano sabatino (19 months ago)
Per chi ama l' archeologia è un luogo da visitare con molta attenzione.reperti a cielo aperto,struttura ben organizzata e si può visitare anche senza guida.la consiglio anche come una semplice passeggiata tra il verde e l'antico porto romano.nelle vicinanze la basilica di Aquileia con il battistero .resti paleocristiano e l'area del museo con sepolcri e urna.
monica pronzini (20 months ago)
Sepolcreto molto piccolo che consta di alcuni monumenti ma è evidente che questo è solo una parte che emerge...bello; non facilissimo da trovare e non molto ben segnalato. C'è un cartello esplicativo; entrata libera.
Samantha Schloss (2 years ago)
Fantastico. Un tesoro unico. Accessibile anche alle persone con ridotta mobilità.
Angelika Weiss (2 years ago)
Interessant und schön! Wenn man Glück hat trifft man eine/n der freundlichen Fremdenführer/innen!
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