Aquileia Archaeological Museum

Aquileia, Italy

The original nucleus of the Archaeological Museum of Aquileia is the eighteenth-century Bertoli collection. The opening of the present venue at villa Cassis by the Austrian government dates back to 1882, whereas the final arrangement occurred after the Second World War.

The finds on display, which date back to the Roman age and all come from local excavations, are really remarkable. Among the most valuable pieces of the collection we would like to point out a Medici Venus, an old man's head of the 1st century B.C. and a rich collection of glassware, amber items, engraved stones and the numismatic collection.

The adjoining garden features the lapidarium, with architectural material, epigraphs, steles, mosaics, funerary areas; a specific section is dedicated to the remains of a Roman boat, found in the Lacus Timavi in Monfalcone.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1882
Category: Museums in Italy

More Information

www.turismofvg.it

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arnob Ahasan (19 months ago)
Its a historical place...many monuments are there very rare...
Marcin Szyniszewski (2 years ago)
Great collection, a lot of mosaics from the Roman houses, and lots of sculptures.
Sabrina Cadorin (2 years ago)
Wonderful!
Vesna Podržaj (3 years ago)
Great epitaph collection.
Levi Emkjær (4 years ago)
Sadly I didn't come here, YOU should though
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.