Cologne City Museum

Cologne, Germany

The armoury was built by the Imperial Town of Cologne as weapons arsenal around 1600 in Dutch Renaissance style. Today, there is the 'Kölnisches Stadtmuseum', which provides an insight into the spiritual, economic and every day life of the city of Cologne and its citizens from the Middle Ages up until today.

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Details

Founded: 1600
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cynthia VerDuin (15 months ago)
Wow, the depth, breadth, and quality of the collection, just Amazing! Great traveling exhibit also. Art that makes you THINK.
Jana Oliveira (15 months ago)
Pleasant surprise with the Ludwig Museum! Variety of modern works of great relevance: Picasso, Dalí, Miró ... The place itself is also a spectacle. Already outside the view of the towers of the Cathedral makes a perfect postcard with the modern architecture of the Museum.
Rodrigo Vaz Pinto (15 months ago)
It's a nice museum. They have a good Picasso collection. If you like modern art, this is the place to go. Close to the Koln main station, so if you have time before the train it takes 1h30/2h00 to see it. Only problem they have a lot of stairs.
Lincoln Miranda Fonseca (16 months ago)
Very nice museum with pieces that will take you through a time travel. Lots of Picasso’s, but just many other interesting artwork.
Vineet Pandey (16 months ago)
Visit here for a good collection of painting including painting of Picasso. It is near by Cologne central railway station. Currently entry fee is 11 euro (year 2019). There is also workshop organised here for painting. Approx 1 to 2 hour will be sufficient to visit here.You can submit your luggage to clock room for free before entering the museum.
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