Disagården is an outdoor museum where visitors get a glimpse of how people lived in rural areas during the late 1800s. Part of Uppland Museum, this site preserves the way of life of19th century flatland farmers. You can see a collection of furnished buildings illustrating living and working conditions. Traditional breeds of animals graze the fields. You can learn about the traditional varieties of apples grown here and enjoy the herb garden.

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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alfonso Silverio (2 years ago)
We had close relatives from abroad who visited us for a week in August 2018. We gave them a our of Uppsala including the Old Uppsala. They found Disagården very interesting among other things in the Old Uppsala.
Alistair White-Horne (2 years ago)
Very imaginative type of museum, great tourguides. Loved it.
Lajos J. Hajdu (2 years ago)
Authentic mini-Skansen in Uppsala, great folklore dancing event during the summer. They teach how to dance polka, schottis, hambo, waltz, snoa etc. Real fun.
Matt Miller (2 years ago)
Quante Cafe with a really nice view outside and park below.
Crissy Cruz (2 years ago)
It's beautiful but extremely cold. Summer visit could be better.
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