The Funbo Church is a medieval stone church, built in the late 12th century. It consists of a rectangular nave, a narrow choir and an apse. The sacristy and the porch were added in the 15th century. The porch was used as the main entrance until 1745, when the current entrance in the western wall was built. The bell tower was erected in 1675.

The church interior includes some notable items, such as a 13th century baptismal font and a 16th century polyptych, manufactured in northern Germany. The altar was inaugurated on 5 December 1301.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Funbo 11, Uppsala, Sweden
See all sites in Uppsala

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lars Johanson (2 years ago)
En vacker plats
Mona Mårtensson (2 years ago)
Var utanför kyrkan och tittade på vattnet i ån.där asparna brukar leka. Bara en strimma vatten .men grönt och fint.
Lajos J. Hajdu (2 years ago)
Very old church, rebuilt several times. The wooden triptichon was carved around 1500. Beautiful naive paintings were painted over a while then restaurated. Although in the weapon house the original colors can be admired. As usual in Sweden the bell tower is farther away. The church is usually closed in order to prevent theft of religious art. Book a visit in advance, well worth the hassle. Best chance to visit the church is when they arrange concert with local performers.
Hjorter Hjorter (2 years ago)
Fin kyrka
Peter Sjöberg (3 years ago)
Vackert bröllop
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lübeck Cathedral

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1173 Henry the Lion founded the cathedral to serve the Diocese of Lübeck, after the transfer in 1160 of the bishop's seat from Oldenburg in Holstein under bishop Gerold. The then Romanesque cathedral was completed around 1230, but between 1266 and 1335 it was converted into a Gothic-style building with side-aisles raised to the same height as the main aisle.

On the night of Palm Sunday (28–29 March) 1942 a Royal Air Force bombing raid destroyed a fifth of the town centre. Several bombs fell in the area around the church, causing the eastern vault of the quire to collapse and destroying the altar which dated from 1696. A fire from the neighbouring cathedral museum spread to the truss of the cathedral, and around noon on Palm Sunday the towers collapsed. An Arp Schnitger organ was lost in the flames. Nevertheless, a relatively large portion of the internal fittings was saved, including the cross and almost all of the medieval polyptychs. In 1946 a further collapse, of the gable of the north transept, destroyed the vestibule almost completely.

Reconstruction of the cathedral took several decades, as greater priority was given to the rebuilding of the Marienkirche. Work was completed only in 1982.

The cathedral is unique in that at 105 m, it is shorter than the tallest church in the city. This is the consequence of a power struggle between the church and the guilds.

The 17 m crucifix is the work of the Lübeck artist Bernt Notke. It was commissioned by the bishop of Lübeck, Albert II. Krummendiek, and erected in 1477. The carvings which decorate the rood screen are also by Notke.

Since the war, the famous altar of Hans Memling has been in the medieval collection of the St. Annen Museum, but notable polyptychs remain in the cathedral.

In the funeral chapels of the southern aisle are Baroque-era memorials by the Flemish sculptor Thomas Quellinus.