Convento de San José

Ávila, Spain

The Convento de San José is a monastery of Discalced Carmelite nuns in Ávila. It is situated not far from the center of the city but outside the medieval walls. Saint Teresa of Jesus was the driving force behind the foundation of the monastery, which was built from 1562 onwards. The statue in the facade was commissioned by King Philip III of Spain via artist Giraldo de Merlo.

In 25 August 1963, Pope Paul VI sent Cardinal Arcadio Larraona Saralegui to canonically crown their antiquated image of Saint Joseph, enshrined within their convent. The same Cardinal as prefect of Sacred Congregation of Rites executed their papal bull of coronation, initially signed by Pope John XXIII.

The convent was built in the year of 1562, although the church, its most important architectural element, was built only in 1607. The church was designed by the architect Francisco de Mora (1553-1610), who devised a church with a single nave covered with a vaulted ceiling and a dome over the transept.

Its main facade, which is set on two levels matches with the top pediment and portal of three arches at the bottom, was one of the most imitated in the religious buildings of the seventeenth century and was adopted as a model of Discalced Carmelite construction. Inside the church is the Chapel of the Guillamas family, which serves as the family crypt.

The Convent of Saint Joseph has been protected under Spanish law since 1968 when it was designated a national monument. The 'Old Town of Ávila with its Extra-Muros Churches' is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, although the monastery is not one of the extra-muros churches listed in the nomination.

The convent currently houses a museum dedicated to Saint Teresa of Jesus.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1562
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ada Marcos Marcos (18 months ago)
Absolutamente prescindible. Desde el punto de vista artístico no vale nada. El colmo es ver a la encargada haciendo ganchillo en su puesto de trabajo mientras hay público.
Ana Parada (19 months ago)
Este lugar es muy especial para mi aquí Tube muchos sentimientos encontrados con las hermanitas
Regi Oliveira (2 years ago)
Primera fundación de Santa Madre Teresa. Visiten allí el pequeño museo y la primera capilla de oraciones dónde estuvo Madre Teresa.
Олег Покровский (2 years ago)
Это бывшая часовня босоногих кармелиток,в которой Тереза,дочь крещеных богатых евреев из Авилы,устроила монастырь Святого Иосифа в 1562 году.Святая Тереза является одним из покровителей Испании, а также покровительницей испанских писателей. Для католиков Тереза Авильская – это культ,хотя экстаз святой Терезы,о котором я специально читал,привлек меня совсем с другой фрейдистской стороны.Святая Тереза провела реформу монашеского ордена кармелитов, заключившуюся в возвращении к первоначальному уставу, основала отдельную ветвь «босоногих кармелиток», а также стала первой испанской писательницей.Но меня книги,картины и скульптуры,посвященные ей,прямо скажем,не особо волнуют.А тем более четки и сандалии.Скучно
Fani Lv (2 years ago)
Muy bonito y la historia del convento que nos contó el guía improvisado aún mejor
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Czocha Castle

Czocha Castle is located on the Lake Leśnia, what is now the Polish part of Upper Lusatia. Czocha castle was built on gneiss rock, and its oldest part is the keep, to which housing structures were later added.

Czocha Castle began as a stronghold, on the Czech-Lusatian border. Its construction was ordered by Wenceslaus I of Bohemia, in the middle of the 13th century (1241–1247). In 1253 castle was handed over to Konrad von Wallhausen, Bishop of Meissen. In 1319 the complex became part of the dukedom of Henry I of Jawor, and after his death, it was taken over by another Silesian prince, Bolko II the Small, and his wife Agnieszka. Origin of the stone castle dates back to 1329.

In the mid-14th century, Czocha Castle was annexed by Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia. Then, between 1389 and 1453, it belonged to the noble families of von Dohn and von Kluks. Reinforced, the complex was besieged by the Hussites in the early 15th century, who captured it in 1427, and remained in the castle for unknown time (see Hussite Wars). In 1453, the castle was purchased by the family of von Nostitz, who owned it for 250 years, making several changes through remodelling projects in 1525 and 1611. Czocha's walls were strengthened and reinforced, which thwarted a Swedish siege of the complex during the Thirty Years War. In 1703, the castle was purchased by Jan Hartwig von Uechtritz, influential courtier of Augustus II the Strong. On August 17, 1793, the whole complex burned in a fire.

In 1909, Czocha was bought by a cigar manufacturer from Dresden, Ernst Gutschow, who ordered major remodelling, carried out by Berlin architect Bodo Ebhardt, based on a 1703 painting of the castle. Gutschow, who was close to the Russian Imperial Court and hosted several White emigres in Czocha, lived in the castle until March 1945. Upon leaving, he packed up the most valuable possessions and moved them out.

After World War II, the castle was ransacked several times, both by soldiers of the Red Army, and Polish thieves, who came to the so-called Recovered Territories from central and eastern part of the country. Pieces of furniture and other goods were stolen, and in the late 1940s and early 1950s, the castle was home to refugees from Greece. In 1952, Czocha was taken over by the Polish Army. Used as a military vacation resort, it was erased from official maps. The castle has been open to the public since September 1996 as a hotel and conference centre. The complex was featured in several movies and television series. Recently, the castle has been used as the setting of the College of Wizardry, a live action role-playing game (LARP) that takes place in their own universe and can be compared to Harry Potter.