San Andrés Church

Ávila, Spain

San Andrés church was built in the quarter of Ajates (a suburb of mediaeval origin in which the main trade was masonry) in the second quarter of the 12th century. It was made in Caleno granite (very typical of the Romanesque style in the town) and is set according to liturgical criteria with an upper end with three apses that correspond to the three naves in the interior; it does not have a transept nave. The protruding central apse is of particular interest thanks to the number of figures and capitals and the closed arches on the straight section of the upper end, which stand as a unique example of Romanesque capitals. The variety of icons on the interior and exterior capitals is the largest of all of Ávila's Romanesque buildings and is associated with the Masters of León. The central apse has two absidioles of a smaller size and a plainer composition.

The upper end is covered with decreasing stepped vaults: barrel vaults along the straight section and calotte vaults along the curved section. The southern absidiole has a lobulated arch used as the entrance and unparalleled in any other church in Ávila at the time.

The south front has a semi-circular window and the keystone of the semi-circular archivolt contains a Chi Rho which, fitted in the 13th century, is considered as the first of its kind in the town. The tower stands next to the western side, built onto the nave during or after the 14th century.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.avilaturismo.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Leydi Yesenia Toledo Arevalo (3 months ago)
You find peace, serenity, friendship, dedication, it has a beautiful structure and history.
JJ Montes (7 months ago)
Spectacular church.
Isabel Dominguez (8 months ago)
A pleasant surprise, I was going to the Incarnation and I ran into it, a pity that it was not open.
Alfonso galán lumbreras (10 months ago)
Essential church to know in essence the elegance and purity of Avila Romanesque. Without forgetting, for a complete visit through such recommended surroundings, to approach the nearby church of the old monastery of S. Francisco, having previously contemplated, together with S. Andrés, the interesting sample of the Church of Concepción, as an austere but characteristic example of the Avila Renaissance.
Javier Fernández (10 months ago)
Very cool a very grateful visit
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