The Minčeta Tower was built by a local builder named Nicifor Ranjina and Italian engineers sent by Pope Pius II in 1463, at the height of the Turkish threat. Originally as a strong four-sided fort, it is the most prominent point in the defensive system towards the land. The tower's name derives from the name of the Menčetić family, who owned the ground upon which the tower was built. By its height and impressive volume, the tower dominates the northwestern high part of the city and its walls.

In the middle of the 15th century, around the earlier quadrilateral fort, Michelozzo built a new round tower using new warfare technique and joined it to the new system of low scarp walls. The full six-meter thick walls of the new tower had a series of protected gun ports. The architect and sculptor Giorgio da Sebenico of Zadar continued the work on the Minčeta tower. He designed and built the high narrow round tower while the battlements are a later addition. The tower was completed in 1464 and became the symbol of the unconquerable city of Dubrovnik.

After a long excavation, a 16th-century cannon foundry was discovered under Minčeta Tower. It is now a museum. Since Minčeta Tower is the highest point of the wall, it is considered to offer a seemingly 'unforgettable' view on the city.

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Founded: 1463
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Robert Cooke (19 months ago)
Probably the best viewing point if the whole city walls. If you don't want to pay the full 200 to do the city walls, and that's understandable, you can come here for 50. It's a lot better value in some ways
Mohamed Adel (20 months ago)
One of the best historical places I have ever visited, still have the old buildings, and the fortress walls was amazing. I loved the whole experience. Surely will do it again.
Cho (22 months ago)
Minčeta Fortress dominates the highest north-western part of the City. It is a large circular tower with a massive battlement suspended by stone sup-porters.The first, smaller, quadrangular tower was constructed by Nikifor Ranjina in 1319. The Florentine architect Michelozzo Michelozzi gave the monumental present time form to the Fort, which was completed in 1464 according to the design of the renowned Renaissance builder Juraj Dalmatinac.
Theo Smith (23 months ago)
The walls of Dubrovnik is a must when visiting the town, this lookout point is stunning and really shows how small the town really is. Nevertheless this vantage point gives one of the best views of the town and sea beyond.
Steve Chappell (23 months ago)
The walk around the top of Dubrovnik's city walls is spectacular. Views of the mountains, the sea, the old town - second to none. Amazing that so much is intact, including the original defense towers. It's a nice, long walk and really just beautiful.
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