Revelin Fort was built outside the city walls and is partially included into the defence complex of the Ploče Gate. The lower part of the fort was built in 1463, in the shape the City model held by St. Blaise on the triptych painted by Nikola Božidarević around 1500. The fort protected both the eastern part of the City from mainland and the entrance to the City Harbour.

In 1538 the fort was strengthened and enlarged in the form of an irregular square according to the instructions of Italian engineer Antonio Ferramolino of Bergamo. Revelin has three entrances, and was encompassed by the moat and sea on three sides. The well-known Renaissance craftsman Ivan Rabljanin kept the foundries for casting cannons and bells in the large Fort interior.

Today, the spacious fort terraces serve as venues for various performances of the Dubrovnik Summer Festival.

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Founded: 1463
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Franica Đevoić (2 years ago)
Monumental fortress facing Ploče gate, with museum,night club and seat of Dubrovnik symphony orchestra.
george kamakaris (2 years ago)
+ excellent surrounding - a lot of smoke & no ventilation They didn't accept any cards, just cash. Also we paid twice for same thing and were asked to pay different amounts. Interesting.... The music was not really for a club at times and the twice the same song got repeated. Prices are high which would be ok if the music was fantastic. *a friend of mine recommended the place and said "it's the best club in Dubrovnik". Our taxi driver laughed at it and said "it's the only club in Dubrovnik"
Guilherme Duarte (2 years ago)
Being a huge Game of Thrones fan, this nightclub provided what was easily one of the best nights of my life: a club inside the freaking castle, medieval decorations, amazing sound accoustic, high ceiling, pretty girls from all over europe and the world, if you choose the right dates. A must go for whoever passes by Dubrovnik.
Kristin Krüger (2 years ago)
Very nice place with a great view. We enjoyed our dinner.
Natacha Kulovrat (2 years ago)
Beautiful
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